FARC-EP vai FARC

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Re: FARC-EP vai FARC

Nelasītas ziņa tas_pats_lv » 14 Feb 2013 10:40

14 February 2013
7 Colombian soldiers killed fighting FARC rebels: army
AFP - At least seven soldiers were killed and five wounded Wednesday in clashes with suspected FARC guerrillas in southern Colombia, amid peace talks between the government and the rebels, the military said.

A statement said the operation had sought to "protect our civilian population" in San Antonio de Getucha, which has seen battles with the terrorist group.

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Re: FARC-EP vai FARC

Nelasītas ziņa tas_pats_lv » 14 Feb 2013 11:10

Dutchwoman swaps Farc AK-47 for peace talks with Colombia government
Tanja Nijmeijer, a graduate whose 'social justice' quest led to a fighting role with the Farc rebels, is negotiating with Havana
Jorge Enrique Botero in Havana, Sibylla Brodzinsky
The Guardian, Wednesday 2 January 2013 16.42 GMT
http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2013/ja ... s-colombia?
As a young girl in the placid Dutch countryside, Tanja Nijmeijer dreamed of a life of chastity, poverty and obedience as a nun. Instead, she took up an AK-47 in faraway Colombia, joined the country's largest and most violent guerrilla group, and has spent the past decade dodging air raids, planting explosives and enduring days-long marches through jungles and mountains.
Nijmeijer – who in the ranks of the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (the Farc) goes by the nom de guerre Alexandra Nariño – is part of the rebel delegation engaged in peace talks in Havana with Colombian government negotiators to try to end a 50-year conflict that has left tens of thousands dead and one tenth of the population internally displaced.
In an interview for the Guardian at the mansion she shares with 29 others from the Farc delegation in El Laguito, an exclusive suburb of Havana, Nijmeijer tries to play down the sudden celebrity she has become, given the oddity of her origins. "I'm not a star," she says. "I'm just another guerrilla fighter."
But her background has little in common with the roughly 9,000 other fighters in the Farc, most of whom were recruited from the poor peasant families of Colombia's remote countryside.
Nijmeijer was born in the Dutch town of Denekamp, near the German border, into a comfortable middle-class life. "When I was little I dreamed of becoming a nun, because I was raised in a very Catholic family," she says. "Then when I started school I began having serious doubts about religion and the existence of God. In university, I became a diehard atheist."
In 1998 looking for internship opportunities and adventure, she answered an ad in her college newspaper to teach English at a private school in the Colombian city of Pereira.
Before coming to Colombia, Nijmeijer says she "didn't know anything" about the Farc or the conflict that was at its height, with the guerrillas staging mass kidnappings throughout the country, overrunning military bases and sabotaging the infrastructure, while rival rightwing paramilitary groups massacred civilians.
She remembers that when she went to the Colombian consulate for her visa an official asked her: "Miss, are you aware that there is a war going on in our country?"
On her arrival in Colombia she grew aware of the country's vast social inequalities – by some counts 52% of arable land is owned by 1.5% of landowners – and about the Farc, whose purported aim is to fight for social justice.
After her internship she went home to the Netherlands but by 2002 she had returned to the country. By that time a previous round of peace talks between the government and the Farc had broken off and Álvaro Uribe, who was then president, was pushing a new hardline security policy.
Nijmeijer became involved in the Farc's network of urban guerrillas in Bogotá, helping to bomb police stations and the city's bus network, crimes for which she has been indicted in Colombian courts. Then she was called to join the ranks with uniform and rifle in hand. Her training, involving marches lasting days through thick jungle, nearly broke her, but her tenacity and revolutionary zeal impressed the commanders.
More than a decade later Nijmeijer only has a hint of an accent in Spanish and uses the colloquialisms and turns of phrases of Colombian peasants. She is unapologetic about her life choice.
"I am part of an armed movement and arms kill. No one denies that," she says. "The hardest thing for me in the guerrillas is the death of my comrades."
Nijmeijer was present when the Farc's top military commander, Jorge Briceño, alias Mono Jojoy, was killed in an air raid on his camp.
Recalling the moment in 2010, she says: "I heard the thump of the helicopter and then there were so many bombs falling that I said: 'No! This is where it ends'. After the first bombs we heard Mono cry out … 'Get the people out of here!' Those were his last words."
She says another difficult part of her guerrilla life has been separation from her family. Contact has been sporadic. In 2005 her mother was allowed to meet her in a rebel camp after traversing the country by helicopter calling out her daughter's name by loudspeaker. Nijmeijer will not say whether her family have seen her in Havana.
Though certainly the most media savvy, Nijmeijer says she is not the only foreigner in the Farc and that she has met Ecuadorans, Venezuelans, Brazilians and other Europeans.
"My case is not unique. This is a historic moment when capitalism, multinationals, and the economy are globalising, and struggles are also globalising, too."
Nijmeijer's presence in the Farc was first detected when the military found her journal at an abandoned camp after a bombing raid in 2007. The battered exercise book revealed the Dutchwoman's revolutionary passions, home sickness – and her apparent doubts about joining.
If the Farc managed to reach power would "the girlfriends of the comrades [be seen]) in Ferrari Testarossas with breast implants and eating caviar?" she wrote.
In 2003 Nijmeijer was chosen to act as translator for three American defence department contractors who were taken hostage after their plane was shot down over Farc territory.
She remembers one of the men, Marc Gonsalves, said to her: "If the government of my country wants it can come in here and wipe you all out in six months." To which she says she responded saying that if they were attacked they would all die, including the Americans.
Gonsalves, who was rescued by the Colombian army in 2008, later told the Miami Herald that he felt very threatened by the Dutchwoman, whom he dubbed a "real deal terrorist".
Nijmeijer says that despite the tough talk she felt a certain compassion for the hostages. "If for me, who was there of my own will, the life [in the jungle] was difficult, how hard it must have been for them who had not chosen that life."
In addition to the criminal charges she faces in Colombia, she has been indicted in the US for participating in the Americans' kidnapping.
The Farc is accused of indiscriminate killing of civilians, forced recruitment and kidnapping. She is unapologetic, saying the guerrillas are not the victimisers. "We have been the victims of this war," she says, despite the tens of thousands of civilians affected by Farc actions.
Notwithstanding the hardships of rebel life, after a month in the Cuban capital Nijmeijer says she "misses the jungle and the comrades".
What would her role be in a post-conflict Colombia? "I am a Farc guerrilla and will continue to be one," she says. "If we achieve peace with social justice I would stay in the Farc and continue to do what is needed."

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Re: FARC-EP vai FARC

Nelasītas ziņa tas_pats_lv » 27 Mai 2013 12:22

27/05/2013
Colombia, FARC rebels reach deal on land reform


Colombia and the Marxist-led FARC rebels have reached agreement on the critical issue of agrarian reform, the two sides said on Sunday in a major step forward for the peace process aimed at ending their long war.
They said the accord called for the economic and social development of rural areas and providing land to the people living there, which addresses one of the main issues that led the FARC, or Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia, to form in 1964 as a communist agrarian reform movement and launch its insurgency.
Lead government negotiator Humberto de la Calle reminded that the agreement would take effect only if an overall peace accord is achieved, which has been the guiding principal of the talks since the beginning.
“Nothing is agreed until everything is agreed,” he said.
De la Calle said it would represent “a historic change, a rebirth of the Colombian countryside.”
The government promised to build up services and infrastructure in rural areas as it tries to end the country’s long history of social and economic inequality.
“What we have agreed to in this accord will be the beginning of radical transformations in the rural and agrarian reality of Colombia, with equity and democracy,” said the joint statement, which was read at the end of the ninth round of the talks, which began Nov. 19 in Havana.
The rebels warned that “certain points” in the agrarian reform accord “necessarily will have to be retaken before the completion of the final agreement,” but said a path was being opened for “the people to act, to mobilize themselves in defense of their rights.”
It was not disclosed how much land would be given out. De la Calle said there would be “an ambitious program of restitution and adjudication of lands” to the rural poor, but that private landowners would not lose their property.
“Legal landowners have nothing to fear,” he said.
The agreement drew praise at the United Nations in New York, where a spokesperson for U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon called it “a significant achievement and important step forward.”
Ban “wishes both delegations further success in their efforts to reach agreement on the remaining issues and to put an end to Colombia’s long conflict,” the spokesperson said.
Adam Isacson, senior associate for security policy at the Washington Office on Latin America think tank, told Reuters the agrarian reform agreement was a “genuine big deal” for Colombia’s peace hopes.
“To have arrived at an agreement on land and rural development with a peasant-based guerrilla group for the first time in nearly 50 years is a step whose importance is hard to overestimate,” he said.
“It greatly increases the probability - now to well over 50 percent - that a final accord will be reached as a result of these talks,” Isacson said.
Many potential obstacles remain, starting with the next agenda item - the delicate subject of political participation for the FARC.

Facing justice

More than 100,000 people have died and millions have been displaced in the war that is now Latin America’s longest-running insurgency and goes on at a low intensity even as the peace discussions continue.
Many Colombians feel the FARC must face justice for war casualties, the use of kidnappings to extort money and involvement in the illicit drug trade, the latter a charge the group has denied.
But criminal charges and jail time could exclude many FARC leaders from taking part in politics.
The rebels have said they are willing to “review” any “error” committed during the war but have ruled out prosecution by a state they say they legitimately rose up against for persecuting and neglecting its own people.
Other remaining agenda points include the logistics of ending the conflict, the drug trade, compensation for victims and the implementation of the final accord.
President Juan Manuel Santos, who recently hinted that he plans to run for re-election in 2014, has said he wants the talks ended this year.
Santos initiated the peace talks last year on a bet the FARC had been so weakened by the government’s 10-year, U.S.-backed offensive against the group that its leaders were ready to negotiate an end to the fighting.
Three previous peace attempts - the last ending in 2002 - had failed.
The rebels have been pushed into remote corners of the country but still are able to attack oil and mining operations that are fueling Colombia’s economic growth.
The war has diverted billions of dollars from the economy as industry is unable to function at full capacity and the government is forced to spend heavily on troops and weapons.
Even if peace with the FARC is achieved, the government still must deal with a smaller rebel force, the ELN or National Liberation Army, and criminal gangs running drug-trafficking operations.
The ELN, with an estimated 3,000 fighters, has expressed interest in seeking a peace accord similar to the one being pursued with the FARC, but Santos has said it must first release captives who include a Canadian citizen.
Norway and Cuba are serving as guarantors for the Colombia-FARC talks, with Chile and Venezuela as observers.
The discussions are set to resume in Havana on June 11, a government spokesman said.
(REUTERS)

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Re: FARC-EP vai FARC

Nelasītas ziņa tas_pats_lv » 04 Jūl 2013 12:26

01/07/2013 / COLOMBIA
FARC stronghold shaken by Colombian farmers revolt

Since the very beginning of negotiations between FARC guerrilleros and the Colombian government mid-June, farmers from the north-eastern Catatumbo region have been protesting. Thousands of “campesinos”, as they are called, have demonstrated to denounce their low quality of life in this FARC-held region.
The protests have been going on for over two weeks but tension rose on June 22 when anti-riot police shot live bullets at protesters, killing two people and injuring eight.
The Catatumbo region is near the border with Venezuela and is a stronghold of the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC). The FARC, which espouses a communist ideology, is the main guerrilla force in the conflict against the Colombian government. The very concept of rural development was one of the main reasons behind the FARC’s creation in 1964.

“We are caught between a rock and a hard place: abandoning our land or illegal farming”
José de Carmen Abril is a member of the Peasant Farmer Association of Catatumbo.
The Peasant Farmer Association of Catatumbo presented a preliminary rural development plan in 2009. We have long been waiting for the implementation of a peasant farmer reserve area [an area benefiting from a rural development plan]. We have been requesting damages to compensate for the marginalisation of local farmers as well as for a new agricultural policy. We want the government to invest here and support farmers with subsidies and other assistance, rather than only trying to eradicate coca culture, which is widespread in our region.

Agricultural reform is actually one of the main discussion topics between the government and the FARC [on May 27, both parties came to an agreement, but some points still need to be negotiated]. However, even though we are directly affected by this issue, we have not at all been involved in the discussions. This is why, on June 11, we decided to go on strike and begin protests: we are calling for our own direct negotiations with the government.
Our protest was ignored at first. So we decided to block all the roads, to make sure our voices would be heard. At that point, the government chose to send its anti-riot squads and the army [the authorities have emphasized that the soldiers were not involved in the repression but were only patrolling the region].
The authorities are now refusing to hold discussions with us so long as we continue protesting, even though they are the ones who resorted to violence. They justify their decision by pretending that our movement has been infiltrated by the FARC and by accusing us of illegally cultivating coca. But for us, coca is a means of survival. The other crops we cultivate here are not subsidised by the government [Editor’s Note: In contrast, the FARC help coca farmers either by funding them directly or by providing seeds and fertilizer]. Moreover, the market value of these other crops is next to nothing. A kilo of cacao is sold for 1,800 pesos [0.72 Euros], while a kilo of coca paste goes for 2.3 million [915 Euros] pesos. The decision is pretty easy!
Mining and oil companies have also been emphasizing the existence of coca fields here in order to push us off our land and gain a foothold in the Catatumbo region, where there are significant mineral resources. We are caught between a rock and a hard place: abandoning our land or illegal farming. [Editor’s note: Our Observer did not wish to discuss the relations between the farmers and the FARC].
Sarra Grira (@SarraGrira.)
http://observers.france24.com/content/2 ... ers-revolt

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Re: FARC-EP vai FARC

Nelasītas ziņa tas_pats_lv » 22 Jūl 2013 10:27

22/07/2013
Colombia vows ‘brute force’ after twin rebel attacks

Colombian President Juan Manuel Santos promised decisive retaliation on Sunday after FARC rebels killed 19 soldiers during a single day, in the biggest blow to the military since peace talks began in November.
Colombia’s president pledged to mount a strong military offensive against the country’s largest rebel movement after guerrillas killed 19 soldiers in two regions on Saturday, the heaviest casualties the armed forces have suffered since the government began peace talks late last year.
President Juan Manuel Santos said on Sunday the army will go after the rebels even though the government has been negotiating to end the half-century-long conflict with the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC) since last year.
“The instructions to our armed forces are not to stop shooting a single moment until we have reached the end of this conflict,” he told reporters, adding that “brute force” was the only solution to resolving the conflict.
Santos said Colombia has put its hand out to the FARC but that the country also had “the club, the military force, and we are going to use it.”
In the bloodier of the two separate attacks on Saturday, 15 soldiers were killed on a road linking two townships in Arauca province near the Venezuelan border, when FARC rebels fired explosives at troops protecting an oil pipeline under construction.
The FARC have a strong presence in the region and frequently attack the existing Cano Limon-Covenas oil pipeline owned by state-controlled oil company Ecopetrol, which passes through the area.
Another four soldiers were killed in clashes in Caqueta province in the south of the country in clashes with the FARC, the army said, adding that six guerrillas were also killed.
The attacks fell on Colombia's Independence Day.
‘Nation must work for peace’
Despite his pledge for a renewed show of force against the rebels, Santos urged peace as he paid tribute to the soldiers killed in the attack in the north.
“Our hearts are with the families of the heroes who sacrificed their lives in Arauca for the tranquility and security of their fellow citizens,” he said.
“All of Colombia must work for peace precisely so that incidents like those that occurred in the last 24 hours never happen again.
"Hopefully the guerrillas will come to their senses and we'll get to the end of this conflict as soon as possible," he added.
Bloody conflict
The FARC is the larger of two left-wing guerrilla movements in Colombia, with around 8,000 fighters – according to government figures – which is about half the number it had a decade ago. The much smaller ELN, or National Liberation Army, with which the FARC has recently strengthened ties, is believed to have around 1,500 guerrillas.
Peace talks between the rebels and the government opened last November in Cuba, the fourth attempt since the 1980s to end Latin America's longest-running armed conflict.
The half-century old guerrilla war has left 600,000 dead, more than 3.7 million displaced and 15,000 missing.
Talks are expected to resume in Havana on July 28.

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Re: FARC-EP vai FARC

Nelasītas ziņa tas_pats_lv » 30 Aug 2013 00:30

Colombian court rejects challenge to Farc peace talks
Colombia's constitutional court upholds law that was prerequisite for negotiations to end country's five-decade civil war
A Colombian high court has upheld a law that allows peace talks with Marxist Farc rebels, rejecting a challenge based on the constitution that could have jeopardised efforts to end five decades of war.
The so-called legal framework for peace, which was approved in congress last year, modified the constitution and laid the foundation for the punishment of war crimes, reparations for victims and eventual peace with the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia.
"The constitutional court considered that to reach stable and lasting peace, it is legitimate to adopt transitional justice measures like the mechanisms of selection and ranking" of crimes, the court said a statement read its top judge, Jorge Iván Palacios.
The court's decision came on the same evening that the country's president, Juan Manuel Santos, announced his government was ready to prepare for peace negotiations with the Farc's smaller counterpart, the National Liberation Army (ELN). The announcement had been expected after the ELN met Santos's pre-condition for talks by freeing a Canadian hostage it had held for seven months.
Though the legal framework for peace is a prerequisite for talks with the rebel movements, the reform has been harshly criticised by the opposition and human rights groups as an inadequate law that offers a "backdoor amnesty" for war crimes and may force victims to turn to the international courts for redress.
Gustavo Gallón, a lawyer with the Colombian Commission of Jurists, filed the legal challenge to three phrases in the text of the law that he said would allow lawmakers to choose which cases of genocide, crimes against humanity and other war crimes could be investigated and punished, leading to impunity for many.
Supporters of the reform argued that any change to its wording could weaken the scope of the entire law, throwing negotiations in Cuba between the rebels and the government into doubt.
The law became the foundation that drew the Farc, Latin America's biggest rebel group, into peace talks late in 2012. At least 200,000 people have been killed in Colombia's internal conflict.
Only members of the Farc and ELN stand to benefit from the law. It excludes criminals involved with drug cartels or former paramilitary groups.
Santos argued that it was unrealistic to attempt to investigate and punish all violations and war crimes during the conflict and called the court's ruling an important step towards ending decades of violence.
"For this process to be successful depends in large part on the justice system, and that we find the middle point between justice and peace that enables us to put a definitive end to this conflict which has been bleeding us for 50 years," he said.
Opposition leaders, however, argue that the law would allow rebels responsible for war crimes to benefit from soft prison sentences or walk away free. Santos's predecessor, Alvaro Uribe, said it violated international treaties because it would effectively pardon crimes against humanity.
The 8,000-member Farc has been weakened by a decade-long US-backed offensive, but a recent rash of attacks against oil installations and heavy combat losses against the rebel group have proven it is still a force to be reckoned with.
The two sides have already reached a partial agreement in Havana on rural development, the first issue on a five-point agenda. They are now negotiating the terms under which the rebels would be incorporated into the political system. They also will seek agreement on the drug trade, reparation of victims and ultimately an end to the conflict.
http://www.theguardian.com/world/2013/a ... CMP=twt_fd

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Re: FARC-EP vai FARC

Nelasītas ziņa tas_pats_lv » 04 Sep 2013 17:29

Public Declaration FARC-EP
The Havana dialogues are in a limbo because of the man who wants to go down in history as the president who made peace in Colombia.
We can still hear the echoes of the fair complaint of the government of the Bolivarian Republic of Venezuela for Santos’ meeting with opponent Capriles in the Nariño Palace.
A lot of people believe that Joe Biden’s (vice-president of the US) visit to Bogotá was the source of Santos’ whim. And they associate it with a plan of Washington led by a Trojan horse called "Trans Pacific Partnership" to destabilize and derail popular governments such as Venezuela, Ecuador, Bolivia and Uruguay, among others. What would drive Santos to announce that fanciful entry of Colombia to the NATO? Does he want to threaten Venezuela or Brazil?
We shouldn´t believe those who qualify the president’s behavior as naïve, because Santos is no fool. As a statesman, he needs to always measure the consequences of his decisions.
Juan Manuel Santos knew that his provocation against the legitimate government of Venezuela would explode like a bomb at the Havana dialogue table, because the issue Venezuela, companion and facilitator of the process, was very sensitive to the FARC, who see the Venezuelans as the main trustful element, and so as the key architects of the peace process.
All this is why Santos invitation to Capriles produces so much perplexity, precisely when the enthusiasm for peace stationed his flag on the Everest peak of reconciliation of all Colombians, because of the partial agreement on land issues, the core of the conflict. Santos’ attitude deflated optimism and the atmosphere conducive to peace that had been constructed so carefully in Havana. We could resume this whole matter saying that if not for Venezuela, the peace talks in the Cuban capital wouldn´t have taken place.
It is contradictory, abysmally contradictory, to pretend to go down in history as the president who made peace, while constantly attacking the peace process. The cold-blooded murder of Alfonso Cano, our commander- champion of reconciliation, has become an indelible stain. On the other hand, nobody understands why the government rejects the necessary bilateral truce proposed by the FARC since the start of the talks, if this is about stopping the war. During the last six months the minister of defense has acted like a sectarian sniper against the process, leaving the impression that there is a lack of consensus on the government’s side. And even the President himself doesn’t miss an opportunity to disqualify the participants with unfounded accusations or to threaten them with leaving the table.
There are other elements that are bugging the dialogue and the construction of an agreement like that annoying clap of the time-and-rhythms- whip in government’s hands. What do they hurry for, to precipitate a useless agreement, a shoddy peace? The progression of such a momentous agreement should not be interfered by electoral calculations or by legislative deadlines. Alongside the table sessions, someone from above designs media campaigns that spread, with some degree of perfidy, the idea of a guerrilla- victimizer on one hand, and the idea of a seraphic, innocent State, without any historical responsibility for violence and institutional terrorism, on the other hand
If the government really wanted peace, it wouldn’t be permanently marking the red lines of its narrow-mindedness, of its indisputable issues; it would act with greatness to facilitate understanding. Where is the inventiveness; where is the common sense? There’s a big inconsistency here. And there is also a great stinginess in defending despicable privileges with stubborn arguments. These attitudes contribute little to the construction of an atmosphere of peace. So what are the dialogues for?
We should understand that this is not a process of submission, it´s a process of peace-building. We are not talking about the insurgency’s incorporation to the current political system, the way it is now, without any transformations for the excluded majorities. What did we fight for then? The best epilogue of this war must be sealed with structural political, economic and social changes, to overcome poverty and inequality.
We must defend this peace process, this hope. Everyone, resolutely, the government, the FARC and the social and political organizations of the country should make a big effort to reach, after decades of military confrontation, the desired reconciliation with social justice. What do we care about Uribe and FEDEGAN if we are determined to achieve peace.

Secretariat of the Central High Command of the FARC-EP
Colombian jungle, June 7th , 2013

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Re: FARC-EP vai FARC

Nelasītas ziņa tas_pats_lv » 18 Mai 2014 04:06

Kolumbijas valdība un FARC panāk vienošanos par narkotiku tirdzniecību
LETA | 17. maijs 2014 23:04
Kolumbijas valdība un FARC panāk vienošanos par narkotiku tirdzniecību

Starp Kolumbijas valdību un komunistisko teroristu grupējumu Kolumbijas Revolucionārie bruņotie spēki (FARC) piektdien panākta vienošanās par nelikumīgo narkotiku tirdzniecības likvidēšanu, kas ir viens no svarīgākajiem jautājumiem Havanā notiekošajās miera sarunās.
Vienošanās vienā no sešiem miera sarunu pamatjautājumiem varētu nostiprināt prezidenta Huana Manuela Santosa pozīcijas pirms 25.maijā gaidāmajām vēlēšanām, kurās viņš pretendē uz vēl vienu pilnvaru termiņu.
Par to, kā tikt galā ar nelikumīgo narkotiku ražošanas un tirdzniecības rūpalu, ko komunisti līdz šim izmantoja savas teroristiskās darbības finansēšanai, abas puses veda sarunas pēdējos sešus mēnešus.
Iepriekš jau panāktas vienošanās vēl divos pamatjautājumos - par lauku apvidu attīstību un par bijušo kaujinieku integrēšanu politiskajā procesā.
Saskaņā ar vienošanos nelikumīgie narkotikas saturošo augu sējumi tiks iznīcināti, un gadījumā, ja zemnieki nevēlēsies to darīt, tas tiks panākts piespiedu kārtā.
Dags Nīlanders, kurš pārstāv Norvēģiju, kas uzstājas kā viens no miera sarunu garantiem, pavēstīja, ka Kolumbija ANO aizbildniecībā organizēs starptautisko konferenci par narkotiku kontrabandas apkarošanu.
"Tiks izstrādāta īpaša ar narkotikām saistītās korupcijas izskaušanas stratēģija," norādīja Nīlanders.
Pusēm vēl atlicis panākt vienošanos trīs pamatjautājumos - par FARC ieroču nolikšanu, par kompensācijām konflikta upuriem un par to, vai miera līgums nododams apstiprināšanai referendumā, uz ko uzstāj valdība.
Kā ziņots, iepriekš piektdien FARC paziņoja par vienpusēju uguns pārtraukšanu prezidenta vēlēšanu laikā.
Komunistiskais teroristu grupējums FARC jau pusgadsimtu cīnās pret Kolumbijas valdību.
Lai gan komunistiem faktiski nav nekāda atbalsta valsts urbanizēto apvidu iedzīvotāju vidū, FARC gadsimtu mijā izdevās paplašināt savu darbību lauku apvidos, izmantojot līdzekļus, kas tika iegūti ar narkotiku kontrabandu un cilvēku nolaupīšanu.
Tiek lēsts, ka FARC rindās šobrīd ir aptuveni 8000 bruņotu kaujinieku, kas ir uz pusi mazāk nekā 2001.gadā. Otra mazāka komunistu grupējuma - Nacionālā atbrīvošanas armija (ELN) - sastāvā varētu būt vēl nepilns pusotrs tūkstotis vīru. Pēdējā laikā abi teroristu grupējumi sākuši sarunas par apvienošanos.
Saskaņā ar valdības aplēsēm bruņotais konflikts, kas ilgst kopš pagājušā gadsimta sešdesmitajiem gadiem, prasījis vairāk nekā 600 000 dzīvību, lai gan saskaņā ar citiem novērtējumiem upuru skaits varētu būt 220 000.
http://www.delfi.lv/news/world/other/ko ... z321qK4QUU

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Re: FARC-EP vai FARC

Nelasītas ziņa tas_pats_lv » 13 Jūn 2014 15:12

http://www.ohchr.org/EN/NewsEvents/Page ... 1&LangID=E
Press briefing noes on Iraq, Mauritania, Egypt and Colombia

Spokesperson for the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights: Rupert Colville
Location: Geneva
Date: 13 June 2014

1) Iraq
UN High Commissioner for Human Rights Navi Pillay will later today issue a press release expressing extreme alarm at the dramatic deterioration of the situation in Iraq, amid reports of summary executions and extrajudicial killings, and the massive displacement of some half a million people, as forces allied with the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL, also known as ISIS), overran a succession of major towns and cities earlier in the week.
The full extent of civilian casualties is not yet known, but reports suggest the number of people killed in recent days may run into the hundreds, and the number of wounded is said to be approaching 1,000. We have received reports of the summary execution of Iraq Army soldiers during the capture of Mosul, and of 17 civilians on one particular street in Mosul City on 11 June.
The High Commissioner will warn the parties to the conflict that they are obliged under international law to treat humanely members of armed forces who have laid down their arms or are hors de combat. She will also stress that murder of all kind, mutilation, cruel treatment and torture constitute war crimes. They must also take all feasible precautions, in areas under their effective control, to spare civilians from the effects of hostilities, and to respect, protect and meet the basic needs of civilian populations.
The following initial reports of human rights violations have been received by the Human Rights Division of the UN mission in Iraq, UNAMI, since the fall of Mosul:
The execution on 11 June of 17 civilians who work for the police that took place on Street 60, close to the airport in southern Mosul.
The execution of a court employee in the central Dawasa area of Mosul.
The execution of 12 people in Dawasa who were believed to have been serving with the Iraqi security forces (ISF) or were members of the police
The reported suicide of four women either after they were raped by members of ISIL, or after an attempt to force them into marriage with ISIL fighters.
The kidnapping of 16 Georgians who work for an Iraqi communications company in Mosul.
Reports that prisoners from Mosul’s prisons, who were then armed by ISIL, have been searching for those they believe to be responsible for their incarceration, including allegations that former prisoners went to Tikrit and killed seven former police officers who had worked in the prison.
Reports that ISIL checkpoints are specifically targeting former soldiers and police and others they perceives as being associated with the Government
We have also received reports concerning violations by the Iraqi army including allegations that, at a certain point on 9 June, soldiers were preventing civilians from leaving Mosul, and were turning them back at checkpoints on the outskirts of the city. We have also received disturbing reports that Iraqi security forces shelled civilian areas during the fighting on 6 and 8 June, resulting in a large number of civilian casualties, with allegations that up to 30 civilians may have been killed during the shelling.

2) Mauritania
We are concerned at death threats issued last week on social media against the prominent Mauritanian human rights activist Aminetou Mint El-Moctar. The threats are based on a fatwa issued by the leader of the movement known as ‘Friends of the prophet’ and declare that “whoever kills her or tears out her eyes will be rewarded by God.”
Ms. Mint El-Moctar is being targeted because she publicly demanded a fair trial procedure, in compliance with Mauritania’s international human rights obligations, for Mohamed Ould M’Kaitir, a young Mauritanian man who has been awaiting trial on charges of apostasy since January. Because of the nature of the charges, no lawyers have been willing to come forward to defend Mr. Ould M’Kaitir, effectively making it impossible at present for him to be given a fair trial. The horrendous threats against Ms. Mint El-Moctar, simply for pointing this out, starkly underline the importance of her public call that a fair trial must be ensured, and illustrate how difficult that will be.
We are concerned that Ms. Mint El-Moctar is not being provided with adequate protection by the authorities, despite having requested it. We remind the government of Mauritania of its obligation to protect its citizens from threats to their life and safety. The government should take all necessary steps to protect Ms. Mint El-Moctar given the very clear public threats to kill or mutilate her, and to investigate and possibly prosecute those making threats which amount to incitement to kill. In this context, we encourage the government to finally adopt the draft law on civil association, which would strengthen the protection of members of civil society in circumstances such as these.
We also remind Mauritania of its obligation to ensure an impartial and fair procedure with full respect for the presumption of innocence until proven guilty. In particular, during the current heightened political discussion in the run up to the presidential elections, the Government should ensure that religion is not used as a tool in the political debate.

3) Egypt
We are concerned about the decision by a Cairo criminal court on June 11 to sentence 25 Egyptian activists, including Ahmed Abdel Rahman, Wael Metwally and human rights defender and blogger Alaa Abd El Fattah in abstentia to 15 years’ imprisonment and to a fine and a further five years of police surveillance after their release. According to Egyptian NGOs, the 25 defendants have been accused of “breaching the protest law, illegal gathering, theft, and attacking officials on duty”.
This verdict constitutes the latest example in a chain of legal cases that have failed to meet international fair trial standards. Since the promulgation of the protest law in November 2013, dozens of protesters, including prominent activists, have been arrested and harshly sentenced in trials that generally fell short of key international fair trial standards.
We have already raised serious concerns about the law on protests, notably the vague definitions of restrictions and the excessive powers bestowed on commanders on the ground, leading to the possible use of lethal force without sufficient safeguards. We have warned that the law could lead to serious breaches of the rights to freedom of peaceful assembly and needs to urgently be brought in conformity with Egypt’s international human rights obligations.

4) Colombia: Joint Declaration of Principles on Victims
We welcome the announcement on 7 June of the Declaration of Principles for the Discussion of Point 5 on the Agenda: Victims by the Colombian Government and the FARC.
In line with human rights standards regarding transitional justice, this declaration of principles, which establishes how the negotiations on victims have to be conducted, states that the satisfaction of the rights of victims is a fundamental guarantee for achieving peace. It also states that the termination of the conflict will contribute greatly to the satisfaction of these rights, which will include the rights to truth, justice, and reparation as well as guarantees of non-repetition.
We particularly welcome the fact that the Declaration clearly states that victims’ rights are non-negotiable. The question is now about reaching an agreement on how these rights might best be satisfied in the context of an armed conflict. In the statement introducing the Declaration, the Government and the FARC have also requested the United Nations to organise consultations with victims, and announced that they will invite a victims’ delegation to the next round of negotiations, which is another praiseworthy development.
After the framework agreement on peace, and three specific agreements on agrarian development, political participation and drug trafficking and illicit crops, we believe this Declaration to be another important milestone on the path to peace. We encourage all parties to now come to a full binding agreement on victims, and hope that this will allow them to move closer towards bringing about a true and lasting peace in Colombia.

ENDS

For more information or media requests, please contact Rupert Colville (+41 22 917 9767 / rcolville@ohchr.org), Ravina Shamdasani (+41 22 917 9169 /rshamdasani@ohchr.org) or Cécile Pouilly (+41 22 917 9310 / cpouilly@ohchr.org)
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Pievienojies: 22 Feb 2011 23:02

Re: FARC-EP vai FARC

Nelasītas ziņa tas_pats_lv » 29 Jūl 2014 16:25

Colombia’s Marxist ELN rebels to blame for explosions – police
Reuters, 29/07 15:46 CET

BOGOTA (Reuters) – Colombia’s Marxist ELN rebels detonated four small explosive devices around the capital, Bogota, early Tuesday morning, causing no injuries but damaging a highway overpass and other structures, police told local media.
Propaganda materials from the National Liberation Army (ELN), which regularly attacks oil facilities in Latin America’s fourth largest economy, were left at the sites of the explosions, police told local La FM radio.
The attacks came nine days before President Juan Manuel Santos is scheduled to be inaugurated for his second term. The 2002 inauguration of hard-line former President Alvaro Uribe was marred by rebel bombings that killed 21 people.
Santos was re-elected in June on promises to end Colombia’s 50-year conflict with leftist rebels through a peace deal.
The government has been in negotiations with the country’s largest guerrilla group, the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia, or FARC, for 20 months. It recently announced preliminary talks with the ELN.
The ELN, which is celebrating its 50th anniversary this year, took responsibility for an explosion in June near Bogota’s financial district that damaged a police station and injured three people.
(Reporting by Julia Symmes Cobb; Editing by Paul Simao)

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