FARC-EP vai FARC

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Re: FARC-EP vai FARC

Nelasītas ziņa tas_pats_lv » 27 Aug 2014 00:18

26 August 2014 - 23H05
FARC negotiator says disarming will be 'long process'

AFP
Colombian FARC-EP leftist guerrillas' delegation member, Andres Paris speaks during an interview on August 25, 2014 in HavanaColombian FARC-EP leftist guerrillas' delegation member, Andres Paris speaks during an interview on August 25, 2014 in Havana
Colombian FARC-EP leftist guerrillas' delegation member, Andres Paris speaks during an interview on August 25, 2014 in HavanaColombian FARC-EP leftist guerrillas' delegation member, Andres Paris speaks during an interview on August 25, 2014 in Havana
Colombia's FARC guerrillas will not give up their weapons at once, and need guarantees from the government to disarm, a negotiator said Tuesday as the peace process marked two years.
Cementing a ceasefire and disarming the leftist rebel group are among the thorniest topics remaining in the talks, the fourth and most promising attempt so far to end the 50-year-old conflict.

As a "subcommittee" of army officers and rebels got down to work on the issue, FARC negotiator Andres Paris warned there would be no instant solution.
"No one has suggested to the FARC, nor have we ever said to the government, that there would be a single moment when we would hand over our arms. I repeat, there will be no photo op of the FARC handing over its arms," Paris told AFP in an interview.
"We see disarmament as a long process."
A ceasefire and disarmament are the next item on the schedule for the peace process, which was launched on August 26, 2012 with the signing of an agreement that laid out a six-point agenda for negotiations.
The talks in Havana have so far produced deals on three points: land reform, political participation for the rebels and curbing the drug trafficking that has fueled the conflict.
The two sides are currently working on the issues of reparations for victims and disarmament, and are then due to tackle the question of how the final peace agreement will be ratified.
As the ceasefire subcommittee began work last week -- the first time active combatants from both sides came together around the same table at the talks -- both the rebels and government called it a sign of progress.
But Paris said ending hostilities would take guarantees and time.
"The ceasefire issue overlaps or interlocks with the issue of political guarantees," he said.
The government says that land reform "can't happen in a short time. They talk about 10 years. But when they talk about disarmament, they tell us, 'You could do that in a day.' That's absurd," he added.
"What's going to make our weapons disappear is turning our guerrilla force into a political party, not handing over our arms."

- 'Long home stretch' -

Since the FARC, or Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia, was founded in the 1960s, the Colombian conflict has killed 220,000 people and caused more than five million to flee their homes.
Latin America's longest-running conflict, it grew out of decades of ideologically driven violence sparked by the 1948 assassination of liberal leader Jorge Eliecer Gaitan.
Over the years, it has drawn in drug gangs and rightwing paramilitaries -- now officially disbanded -- as it has defied three previous peace bids.
The current negotiations opened in November 2012 after months of secret brokering by late Venezuelan president Hugo Chavez.
They have survived Chavez's death, revelations of spying on the talks by Colombian army intelligence, and a June presidential election widely viewed as a referendum on continuing the peace process.
Paris said that while there was still "a long road to walk," the talks had gone further than any previous peace attempt.
"We've advanced a lot. What the two delegations, the government and the guerrillas, have accomplished must be considered a truly golden achievement," he said.
Experts agreed there had been substantial progress but warned a definitive peace deal was far from certain.
"Never before has Colombia had a peace process as advanced as this one," said Ariel Avila of the Peace and Reconciliation Foundation in Bogota.
But he said a final agreement should be reached within the next six to seven months because after that, "the conversations would become so long the process would run out of steam and no one would believe in it."
Christian Voelkel of the International Crisis Group in Bogota said the remaining discussions were politically and socially sensitive.
"The process is in the home stretch, but it's a pretty long stretch," he said.
Date created : 2014-08-26

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Re: FARC-EP vai FARC

Nelasītas ziņa tas_pats_lv » 17 Nov 2014 12:26

http://www.euronews.com/2014/11/17/colo ... ace-talks/
Colombian President Juan Manuel Santos has suspended peace talks with Marxist FARC rebels after an army general was kidnapped.
General Ruben Dario Alzate was captured on a river near the city of Quibdo after getting off a boat.
Another military official and a lawyer were also abducted. One soldier managed to escape and inform authorities.
Santos’s government and FARC, or the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia, have been working towards a bilateral cease-fire and disarming of the rebel group.
The military was handling the logistics of the militant disarmament.
Although nobody has claimed responsibility for the kidnappings, the president had warned FARC that it risked jeopardising the peace process after two soldiers were abducted last week.

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Re: FARC-EP vai FARC

Nelasītas ziņa tas_pats_lv » 21 Nov 2014 09:46

FARC to release kidnapped Colombian general

Latest update : 2014-11-20
Colombian Marxist rebels agreed to release an army general who was captured by their comrades over the weekend, a move that may lead to a resumption of peace talks and defuse a crisis that threatened to extend five decades of war.
The Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC) promised to free General Ruben Dario Alzate and four others captured in the past two weeks “as soon as possible” after reaching agreement on liberation terms with the government and guarantor nations Cuba and Norway.
President Juan Manuel Santos’s office responded immediately to the announcement, pledging to resume talks as soon as the hostages are free.
Alzate and two others were seized on Sunday by a FARC patrol as they left a boat in the poor and crime-ridden coastal region of Choco, prompting Santos to halt talks and throwing into doubt the two-year peace process under way in Cuba.
Just days earlier, the rebels had kidnapped two soldiers in eastern Arauca department.
“The government will give its total collaboration to guarantee the safe return of these people to their homes, which we hope will be in the shortest time possible,” Santos’s office said in a brief statement.
“Once they are all free, the government’s delegation will return to Havana.”
The FARC’s decision to release the captives may counter critics of the peace process who say the rebels are not serious about ending Latin America’s longest-running war, which has killed more than 200,000 people since it began in 1964.
The suspension of talks is the most serious setback to peace efforts after months of complicated discussions resulted in partial accords on three out of five agenda items.
The most recent peace process with the FARC collapsed in 2002 after the group used the breathing room of a demilitarized zone to build its fighting force, intensify its cocaine trafficking, and take hostages.
The final straw came when the FARC boarded a commercial plane and seized a senator, who was held captive for six years.

Harshly condemned

Santos has staked his presidency on bringing peace to Colombia, winning reelection this year against a right-wing opponent who threatened to ditch the talks and finish the FARC on the battlefield.
Even while security has improved massively over the last decade or so, peace talks have been taking place amid continued conflict. The rebels have renewed their call for a bilateral ceasefire that they say would improve the climate for negotiations.
Alzate is the highest-ranking military hostage ever taken by the FARC. A soldier and a civilian lawyer were captured along with him.
The FARC says it has stopped kidnapping for ransom but maintains military personnel are fair targets in the absence of a ceasefire. Alzate was considered a prisoner of war.
Certain undisclosed conditions must be met before the FARC will free the hostages, representatives from Cuba and Norway said in Havana.
Santos, after harshly condemning the FARC’s move in the last few days, set a more conciliatory tone during a speech in central Tolima on Wednesday, expressing hope that negotiations would resume.
“We need to abandon our weapons, the violence and end this armed conflict,” Santos said in the town of Ataco. “That is why I hope this impasse that has appeared in the Havana negotiations will be resolved soon.”
A massive rescue operation in Choco’s dense jungle terrain had been under way since Sunday, though there were fears a military effort to release Alzate could endanger the hostages. It is unclear whether orders still stand for FARC fighters to kill captives if a rescue is attempted.
The army offered a 100 million peso ($46,000) reward for information leading to the hostages’ rescue, military sources confirmed to Reuters on Wednesday.
The deal was announced in Havana by representatives of the Cuban and Norwegian governments, the guarantors of the peace talks: Rodolfo Benitez of host nation Cuba, and Rita Sandberg of Norway, which is acting as a facilitator.
(REUTERS)
http://www.france24.com/en/20141120-col ... al-alzate/

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Re: FARC-EP vai FARC

Nelasītas ziņa tas_pats_lv » 19 Dec 2014 17:10

17 December 2014 Last updated at 21:50 GMT
Colombia Farc rebels declare indefinite unilateral truce
Colombia's Farc rebels have declared a unilateral ceasefire for an indefinite period, starting from Saturday.
The leftist rebels said the truce should become a formal armistice and would only end if they were attacked.
The announcement was made in Cuba, where the Farc has been holding peace talks with the Colombian government.
President Juan Manuel Santos has so far refused to suspend military action, saying the rebels would use a bilateral truce to rearm and regroup.
The peace talks in Cuba - which began in 2012 - are aimed at ending five decades of conflict that has killed an estimated 220,000 people.

'Renewed pressure'

"We have resolved to declare a unilateral ceasefire and end hostilities for an indefinite period of time, which should be transformed into an armistice," the Farc said in a statement.
Colombia's largest rebel group had previously called for a bilateral truce - but these moves have been rejected by the government in Bogota.
The peace talks were almost derailed in September after the Farc captured Gen Ruben Dario Alzate, prompting President Santos to suspend the negotiations.
The rebels released the general unharmed in November in an effort to revive the talks.
But following Wednesday's announcement by the Farc, President Santos may come under renewed pressure now to match the rebel offer, BBC regional analyst Leonardo Rocha says.

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Re: FARC-EP vai FARC

Nelasītas ziņa tas_pats_lv » 04 Mar 2015 13:37

04 March 2015
Colombia's FARC rebels say no peace without immunity
HAVANA (AFP)
Colombia's leftist FARC guerrillas said Tuesday they will not sign any peace deal that allows their members to be tried and jailed.
"We insist that no deal is possible if it allows for a single day of prison for any guerrilla for having exercised the right to rebellion," the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC) said in a statement read out by peace negotiator Ricardo Tellez.
"The FARC's members are not the ones who have enjoyed impunity throughout the Colombian conflict, but rather the oligarchy, the ruling class and the armed forces."
The Colombian government did not immediately respond to the rebels' statement.
Negotiators seeking to end the more than five-decade guerrilla war at talks in Havana are under growing international pressure to guarantee justice for crimes committed during the conflict.
Last week former UN secretary general Kofi Annan warned during a visit with both sides that the International Criminal Court could step in if the final peace deal did not bring justice for victims of the conflict.
The FARC admits its rebellion has affected civilians, but denies having committed crimes against humanity or violated international humanitarian law.
The peace talks in Havana, launched in November 2012, have produced partial deals on several issues but have yet to yield a definitive accord.
For the past seven months government and rebel negotiators have been discussing the delicate question of reparations for victims.
The conflict, which has drawn in several leftist rebel groups, right-wing paramilitaries and drug traffickers at various times, has killed 220,000 people and uprooted more than five million since it erupted in 1964.
2015 AFP

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Re: FARC-EP vai FARC

Nelasītas ziņa tas_pats_lv » 16 Apr 2015 11:48

Deadly rebel assault puts Colombia peace talks in jeopardy

Latest update : 2015-04-16
Eleven soldiers were killed and 19 injured in an attack by leftist guerrillas in Colombia, likely a major violation of the rebels’ pledge of a unilateral ceasefire that throws into doubt the future of peace talks.
The attack occurred around midnight Tuesday in the volatile southwest department of Cauca when an army unit on a routine patrol was surprised by guerrillas firing homemade explosives and grenades. A corporal and 10 others were killed during the ambush by a unit of the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia, or FARC, the army’s third division said in a statement.
President Juan Manuel Santos condemned the attack, which he said was premeditated and not the result of any army incursion. He also lifted a month-old suspension of aerial bombings of FARC camps that had been trumpeted as a major milepost in the effort to end a half-century of fighting.
“Let it be very clear to the FARC: I’m not going let myself be pressured by vile acts like this,” Santos, flanked by his top military commanders, reading a prepared statement Wednesday en route to the combat zone in a rural outpost called La Esperanza, or Hope.
Colombians took to social media to denounce the attack and call on Santos to abandon the peace talks.
“Santos, don’t betray us anymore,” former President Alvaro Uribe, a fierce critic of the peace process, said on Twitter. “Don’t justify the murder of our soldiers with this talk of war you want to end.”
FARC negotiators in Cuba committed in December to a unilateral cease-fire to promote peace talks that have taken place on the communist-led island over the past two years, saying they would only fire weapons if attacked by the armed forces.
While adherence to the leadership’s command has been less than complete, the latest attack is the most serious breach to date and could destroy momentum toward a deal that has been building since the FARC last November shocked much of Colombia by releasing an army general that it had accidentally captured.
Last month, both sides agreed on a plan to begin jointly removing dangerous land mines that litter large parts of the countryside. Soon afterward, the government suspended all aerial bombings of guerrilla camps, an order that Santos extended this month.
Such good-faith gestures are seen as crucial in rallying support for a deal when some of the thorniest issues, such as whether rebel leaders will serve time in jail for atrocities and the fate of US drug indictments against the FARC’s leadership, remain to be negotiated. The two sides have already reached deals on land reform and political participation for former rebels.
The latest attack underscores one of the biggest obstacles in the way of a deal: the FARC leadership’s lack of control over the estimated 7,000 troops still on the battlefield. That’s especially true in turbulent, lawless areas like Cauca, where rebel commanders are known to be heavily involved in drug-trafficking.
From Havana, the guerrilla commander known by his nom de guerre Pastor Alape said he was unaware of the circumstances that led to Tuesday’s combat. But he blamed the incident on Santos’ refusal to declare a bilateral cease-fire, something the FARC has been urging since the start of negotiation.
“It’s urgent for the nation, something the entire country is waiting for,” he said.
Santos rejected such an option, repeating that he would only agree to a truce once a definitive deal to end the fighting was struck. But he also avoided any hint he would walk away from negotiations amid the latest crisis.
“Acts like this demonstrate once again the need to accelerate the peace talks,” he said.
(AP)

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