Lībija (2011)

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Nelasītas ziņa tas_pats_lv » 11 Jan 2012 18:36

Fierce clashes in Tripoli between two former Libyan rebel groups
Two former Libyan rebel factions clashed on Tuesday in hours of gun battles in central Tripoli that left five fighters dead, a Tripoli military council official said.
3:40PM GMT 03 Jan 2012
Former rebels of Tripoli and a separate group of fighters from the city of Misurata fought with machine guns, rocket-propelled grenades and anti-aircraft guns.
Col Walid Shouaib, a member of Tripoli Military Council, said the clashes were triggered by arrest of a Misurata fighter on New Year's Eve by Tripoli fighters. He was suspected of robbery and the Misurata fighters were trying to free him.
Disparate groups of former revolutionary fighters have clashed repeatedly since the end of the eight-month civil war that toppled Muammar Gaddafi's regime in October. Disbandment of these armed groups, which are divided by the regions where the operate, has posed a challenge to Libyan authorities.
While playing a vital role in overseeing security of key state institutions in the capital, the uncontrolled ownership of weapons and the absence of a central security administration has given the militias a free hand in ruling areas under their control.
According to Shouaib, the tensions between the two militias began on the night of the arrest when a group of Misurata fighters tried to free the detained man, but failed. Instead, they were arrested as well. A top Misurata commander managed to mediate the release of all the men except for the one arrested for robbery.
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldne ... roups.html

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Nelasītas ziņa tas_pats_lv » 11 Jan 2012 18:38

Former Gaddafi colonel becomes Libyan army's new chief of staff
A former colonel in Muammar Gaddafi's military has been appointed as the new chief of staff of the Libyan army, two members of the country's ruling National Transitional Council said.
8:36PM GMT 03 Jan 2012
A former colonel in Muammar Gaddafi's military has been appointed as the new chief of staff of the Libyan army, two members of the country's ruling National Transitional Council said.
Yussef al-Mangush, who took voluntary retirement from Gaddafi's military and even participated in the rebellion against the former leader, was promoted to the rank of general and appointed as chief of staff, said NTC member Abdelrazzak al-Aradi.
His appointment was confirmed by Fathi Baaja, another member of the NTC from the eastern city of Benghazi, the cradle of the uprising that toppled Gaddafi.
The post has been vacant since the murder in July of General Abdel Fatah Yunis, who commanded the former rebels in eastern Libya against Gaddafi's diehards.
Mangush is currently a deputy defence minister in the interim government of Prime Minister Abdel Rahim al-Kib.
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldne ... staff.html

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Re: Lībija (2011)

Nelasītas ziņa tas_pats_lv » 11 Jan 2012 18:43

ICC gives Libya two weeks to decide what to do with Saif Gaddafi
The International Criminal Court has given the new Libyan authorities two weeks to decide what to do with Saif al-Islam Gaddafi, the imprisoned son of the former leader. Gaddafi, who was captured on Nov 19, has been indicted by the International Criminal Court in The Hague for two counts of alleged crimes
By Richard Spencer, Middle East Correspondent
5:47PM GMT 10 Jan 2012

Saif al-Islam, once seen as a reformist possible successor to his father, faces indictments before the Hague-based ICC for complicity in crimes allegedly committed by his father in his attempts to put down the revolution against his rule last February.
The Libyan authorities say he should be tried in Libya itself, however, and have been holding him in a house in the town of Zintan, south-west of the capital Tripoli, since his capture in the Sahara at the end of November.
Under ICC rules, countries must say what they intend to do with captives wanted by the court. Libya had been given until Tuesday to give information of Saif al-Islam's conditions, access to legal advice, and whether and when they will hand him over.
As the deadline approached, the Libyan government formally requested an extension to the end of January, but the ICC said in a statement that a response after January 23 would cause an "undue delay in the proceedings".
Although Luis Moreno-Ocampo, the chief prosecutor, has accepted Libya's right to hold the trial, ICC judges can still rule they wish to hear the case themselves if they deem conditions there not suitable.
The Libyan authorities themselves have given no indication of how they would handle the formidable logistics of setting up a legal system that would satisfy the international community as well as allowing the trial to be witnessed by hundreds of international journalists.
They told a Human Rights Watch investigator who was taken to see their captive last month that he would be allowed to see a lawyer once a secure prison had been established for him in Tripoli.
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldne ... ddafi.html

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Re: Lībija (2011)

Nelasītas ziņa tas_pats_lv » 23 Jan 2012 16:45

Enemy at the gates? Libyans storm NTC headquarters
Published: 21 January, 2012, 22:20
Edited: 22 January, 2012, 22:51
http://rt.com/news/libya-storm-ntc-headquarters-375/
Some 200 Libyan protesters stormed the headquarters of the country’s transitional government on Saturday in a show of frustration with the slow pace of national reform. But will their calls for post-Gaddafi transparency fall on deaf ears?

­Two weeks of protests in the city of Benghazi – the heart of the uprising against Muammar Gaddafi last February – came to a head when protestors used grenades to blow the gates off the National Transitional Council (NTC) compound housing the interim government.

The protesters, who demand a meeting with the country’s interim leaders, shouted through the windows at NTC members who could be seen pacing inside of the building, the Associated Press reports.

The demonstrators had previously set up a small encampment outside the compound as they called for greater justice and transparency from Libya’s new leadership.

But tensions mounted when the NTC passed a series of laws determining how parliamentary elections would be conducted this June – making no mention of how seats in the new legislature would be divvied out between different cities and regions.

Seeing that the allocation of legislative seats will ultimately shape the distribution of the country’s vast oil wealth, many demonstrators contend the NTC is not seeking to fulfill the people’s long-standing democratic aspirations.

“The election laws have not been approved by thousands of Libyans, and do not honor those who died for our freedom,” said Tamer al-Jahani, a lawyer taking part in the protest. “We don’t want to replace one tyrant with another,” AP cites him as saying.

While some were centered on the future of the country’s political institutions, others were focused on the plight of those anti-Gaddafi forces injured during the war.

However, calls for greater freedoms belie the actual situation on the ground in post-Gaddafi Libya.

According to a November report by the UN Secretary General, at least 7,000 men, women and children were illegally detained by rebel militias in Libya. Many of them are being held in prisons outside of NTC control, and have been subjected to torture and other systematic forms of mistreatment.

Clashes between rival militia factions have also become an increasingly common sight in the streets of Tripoli.

Coupled with warnings from British officials last month that senior level al-Qaeda leaders have been making their way to Libya to capitalize on an ever-expanding security vacuum, the developments could signal a potentially explosive crisis brewing in the country.

­Radio host and author Stephen Lendman believes the crowds are unhappy with the new, Western-backed government.

“A couple of hundred former rebel fighters stormed the Parliament in Benghazi," he says. "They complain they are not given aid properly, they are not treated properly. The new election was drawn up, and the people were promised they would have a say, but the people have had no say whatsoever – everything has been secretive. And the NTC government – let’s face it – is the puppet of Western governments serving Western interests, having absolutely no interest in ordinary Libyans.”

­It's Iraq all over again, says international consultant Adrian Salbuchi, with the flag of democracy brought in to guard Western geopolitical interests and pump oil while the "invaded" nation’s needs are ignored.

The mission of the ruling National Transitional Council is not, Salbuchi says, "to improve life. Libya already had a high standard of living under Gaddafi. What Libya does have is ninth-largest global oil reserve, and the top oil reserve in Africa. And that is what the National Transitional Council is being supported for. They promote Western oil companies, Western financial interest in Libya,” he told RT.

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Re: Lībija (2011)

Nelasītas ziņa tas_pats_lv » 23 Jan 2012 16:47

NTC head may resign – if he makes it out alive
Published: 23 January, 2012, 07:14
http://rt.com/news/ntc-resign-libya-regime-411/
The deputy head of Libya’s National Transitional Council is resigning in light of continuing protests. Sukant Chandan, a spokesman for British Civilians for Peace in Libya, says the Council’s head may resign as well – if he doesn’t get killed first.

­“The Gaddafi regime could control all of Libya, could find peace amongst all the tribes. The new regime cannot even control something in one town or one area," Chandan told RT. "They’ve been selling their oil and natural resources and sovereignty to NATO. And now the thieves – that is, the rebels – are all falling out with each other, they can’t even be paid by their own masters." He continues, "they've performed regime change on behalf of the former colonialists of Libya.”

Chandan says those who wish not to believe what Gaddafi said of life in Libya after the fall of his regime should listen to Jalil, who he says “probably is about to resign – if he’s not assassinated, like NTC military head Abdel Fatah Yunis.”

The analyst says Jalil has warned that Libya is “in danger of descending into a bottomless pit.”

“So really, this is the achievement of ‘freedom and democracy’ by NATO,” Chandan concluded.

And Abdel Hafiz Ghoga, the NTC's deputy head, has been accused of opportunism after dropping his allegiance to Gaddafi as the uprising kicked off. On Saturday, crowds of protesters stormed the NTC headquarters in Benghazi, angered by how the council has been handling the country's assets. Demonstrators threw rocks and metal bars at the building, breaking windows and damaging Jalil's car.

Mass rallies have been raging for weeks in the city of Benghazi, which is considered the cradle of the revolution that toppled the Gaddafi regime.
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Re: Lībija (2011)

Nelasītas ziņa tas_pats_lv » 24 Jan 2012 15:50

http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2012/ja ... bani-walid
Gaddafi loyalists take back Bani Walid
Reports say at least four people killed in clashes between besieged NTC forces and well-organised pro-Gaddafi fighters

10.10am: Reports that Bani Walid has been taken by pro-Gaddafi fighters are not true, according to Aziz Daw, a British based dentist who comes from the town and is in regular contact with relatives there.
In phone interview, Aziz blamed the reports on propaganda from local National Transitional Council official Mohammed Bashir. He said fighting broke out between rival militias the 93 brigade and the May 28 brigade.
Aziz said there is frustration at the way the new authorities have run Bani Walid. The NTC is failing to reconcile differences in Libya, he added.

http://audioboo.fm/boos/636640-it-is-nt ... ent-claims

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Re: Lībija (2011)

Nelasītas ziņa tas_pats_lv » 26 Jan 2012 15:19

26 January 2012 Last updated at 11:22 GMT
Libyan militias are holding thousands of people in secret detention centres, while the interim government struggles to assert authority, the UN has heard.
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-africa-16735217
The Security Council was told recent violence in Tripoli, Bani Walid and Benghazi highlighted the problem.
More than 8,000 pro-Gaddafi supporters are being held by militia groups, amid reports of torture, UN officials said.
The charity Medecins Sans Frontieres says it has suspended some operations because its work was being "exploited".
The humanitarian medical organisation said it had stopped work in detention centres in the north-western city of Misrata because some patients were being brought in for care between interrogation sessions.
At least four people died in clashes in Bani Walid, a former Gaddafi stronghold, on Monday.

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Re: Lībija (2011)

Nelasītas ziņa tas_pats_lv » 26 Jan 2012 15:26

26 January 2012 Last updated at 12:32 GMT
Libyan detainees die after torture, says Amnesty International
Libya's former rebels gather at a checkpoint near a mosque, outside Bani Walid on January 2012 Rebels have reportedly been expelled from ex-Gaddafi stronghold Bani Walid
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-africa-16741937
Several people have died after being tortured by militias in Libyan detention centres, humanitarian group Amnesty International has said.
It claimed to have seen patients in Tripoli, Misrata and Gheryan with open wounds to their head, limbs and back.
Meanwhile, charity Medecins Sans Frontieres has suspended operations in Misrata after treating 115 patients with torture-related wounds.
The UN says it is concerned about the conditions in which patients are held.
"The torture is being carried out by officially recognised military and security entities as well as by a multitude of armed militias operating outside any legal framework," a spokesman for London-based Amnesty said.

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Re: Lībija (2011)

Nelasītas ziņa tas_pats_lv » 17 Feb 2012 11:26

Groundhog year: Cooking Syria ‘Libya-style’
Libya is marking the first anniversary of the revolution that brought the country plenty of destruction, but not as much democracy. And while NATO denies intentions to interfere with Syria, Libyans have learned the hard way “freedom” is exported.
­NATO has 'no intention’ 2.0

­"NATO has no intention whatsoever to intervene in Syria. We appreciate very much all the efforts to find a solution to the conflict in Syria. I appreciate the work of the Arab League. I do believe that a regional solution has to be found," NATO Secretary General Anders Fogh Rasmussen said in Brussels on Wednesday.

It would be easy to take these words at face value, if less than a year ago Fogh Rasmussen did not declare that NATO would not intervene in the conflict between Muammar Gaddafi and the Libyan opposition:

"I would like to stress that NATO has no plans to intervene [into Libya] and we have not received any request," he said in February 2011.

The Libyan recipe is being followed with utmost care, down to the tiniest detail. Washington has already come up with calls for "Friends of a democratic Syria" to unite and rally against the government of President Bashar Al-Assad.

The club has every chance of growing into a new iteration of the “Friends of Libya,” which oversaw international help for opponents of late, deposed Libyan leader Muammar Gaddafi. Moreover, the group coordinated NATO military operations to protect Libyan civilians, something that is not envisioned in Syria – for now.
­Excellent investment vs. Humanitarian mission

Still, humanitarian and peacekeeping rhetoric around Syria is reaching a boiling point, and many cannot get rid of an unpleasant feeling of déjà vu. During the uprising in Libya, the UN and NATO dashed to the country to end “crimes against humanity,” but with the very beginning of the military operation, many wondered at the sudden zest for human rights.

“You have to find a political and economic interest before you start believing in humanitarian reasons. In all humanitarian interventions there is another reason that is much more important,” science professor at Paris West University Nanterre La Defense Pierre Guerlain told RT.

In Libya’s case, no sooner had UN resolution 1973 on the “no-fly zone” been adopted, than the National Transitional Council (NTC) approached the French leadership with a tempting offer. France was to get 35 per cent of Libya’s oil sector in exchange for “full and constant support” of the NTC in its fight against Muammar Gaddafi, reported France’s Liberation newspaper.

British author and Guardian journalist Simon Jenkins says that access to oil and the Mediterranean were the real causes of the Libyan war.

“There are mixed motives in all these interventions. We tend to intervene in countries where we have some interests – in this case oil,” he told RT.

Another lucrative option for Western powers was pricey rebuilding contracts. First, bombs tore Libya apart, and later Western companies got paid to put the country back together. According to the UK Department of Trade and Investment, the value of contracts to rebuild Libya in areas ranging from electricity and water supplies to healthcare and education, could amount to upwards of US $300 billion over the next 10 years.

The game in Syria seems more complicated, as the country is but a modest producer of oil and gas. The Arab Gas Pipeline, which exports Egyptian natural gas to Jordan, Lebanon and Israel, might be of some regional interest. But even after the pipeline is expanded to Turkey, Iraq and Iran, its importance will hardly be global.

Targeting Damascus may be a geopolitical tool employed against Iran in the regional power reshuffle. A revival of Iran’s empire casts worries on Turkey and Qatar, and with Tehran’s growing influence over post-war Iraq and Afghanistan, an attack on Assad’s regime, a close Iranian ally, seems only too logical.

“Damascus is to be persecuted not exactly for repressing the opposition, but because it is unwilling to sever ties with Tehran,” the head of the Russian national security council, Nikolay Patrushev, told Kommersant newspaper.
­Western troops out – off with democracy?

NATO, taking control of the Libyan operation on March 31, 2011, interpreted the UN resolution the way it saw fit. Under the flag of “protecting civilians,” the alliance quickly focused on getting rid of Muammar Gaddafi and his regime, and propping up a government, which is now more or less in power.

In late October, Gaddafi was assassinated in his hometown of Sirte, an event videotaped and broadcasted by media around the world. This brought the fighting to an end, and NATO was quick to declare their campaign in the country as one of the “most successful in NATO history.”

Given all that, what is to become of Syria if the West chooses to bring democracy there as well? The opposition Syrian National Council has already offered Gaddafi’s fate to President Assad and his family.

Three months into a relative peace in Libya, the circumstances surrounding Muammar Gaddafi’s death remain a mystery. Armed groups still answer to no central authority in NATO’s newly-liberated Libya, and refuse to give up their arms.

On February 16, the UN General Assembly passed the new draft resolution on Syria calling for President Assad to step down and demanding a transition to democratic rule.

­Elena Ostroumova, Elena Medvedeva, RT

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Re: Lībija (2011)

Nelasītas ziņa tas_pats_lv » 21 Feb 2012 14:22

Massive ex-Gaddafi weapons cache turns up in Algeria
Published: 21 February, 2012, 02:10
Two caches with 43 anti-aircraft missiles and other weaponry have been unveiled in Algeria. Local security forces say the arsenal was smuggled in from Libya and buried near the border.
­The two caches were found near the town of In Amenas, in southern Algeria on the Libyan border. That is according to Algerian daily El Watan, which cited on Monday an unnamed security official. One cache contained Russian 9K338 Igla-S (NATO reporting name SA-24 Grinch) and 9K32 Strela-2 (SA-7 Grail) shoulder-fired surface-to-air missile systems – all taken from the arsenals of Libya’s former leader, the late Muammar Gaddafi.
No official Algerian response has followed. It is reported, though, that information of the contraband came from Libyan arms smugglers whose business was stopped last year by Algerian forces. As part of a security plan initiated jointly with Niger and Mali, Algerian authorities succeeded in blocking about thirty infiltration routes used by traffickers and terrorists. In 2011, the security services had arrested 87 Libyans who smuggled weapons from their country into Algeria.
Algeria is not the only country that sounded an alarm about intensive arms trafficking on its borders. The black market for arms has inundated many other African states with munitions from Libya, says Russia’s special envoy to Africa Mikhail Margelov.
“I recently visited Nigeria, Mali, Mauritania and Morocco, and for these four countries what is happening in the desert is a real nightmare,” he told RT in January. “One of the tribal leaders said to me, what happened in Libya undermined the market. I asked, ‘What market?’ He said, ‘Today, a Soviet or Chinese-made MANPAD [man-portable surface-to-air missile] costs the price of two Kalashnikovs.' It’s a real problem, because arms trafficking can end up somewhere in the south of Africa or somewhere in the south of Europe.”
It is estimated that Gaddafi’s arsenals numbered some 20,000 of such missiles – the largest among non-producing countries. The main fear here is that all this deadly cargo can now be easily smuggled out of Libya by various terrorist groups, including local branches of Al-Qaeda, and then used to attack civil aviation targets anywhere in the world.
Thousands of missiles are already believed to have gone missing when Libyan rebels toppled Muammar Gaddafi and helped themselves to government stockpiles.

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Re: Lībija (2011)

Nelasītas ziņa tas_pats_lv » 22 Feb 2012 16:05

No rest for Libya: Over 130 killed in tribal clashes
Published: 22 February, 2012, 03:14
More than 130 people have been killed in fighting between two tribes in Libya’s remote south-eastern area. This comes as NTC forces struggle to secure full control over Libya following the fall of the Gaddafi regime.
Some 113 people from the Toubu tribe and 23 from the Zwai tribe have been killed in the remote town of Kufra in the Sahara Desert, tribal sources told Agence-France-Presse on Tuesday.
The ruling NTC has so far not intervened. "We tried calling the NTC but they have not responded," the chief of the Toubu tribe told AFP.
"We have been under siege for a week. Since the start of the clashes, 113 people from our side have been killed, including six children," said Issa Abdelmajid, chief of the Toubu tribe, which fought Muammar Gaddafi’s forces during last year’s uprising. He added that 241 members of his tribe had been injured.
A spokesperson for the Zwai tribe confirmed 23 deaths and said that 53 people from their side had been wounded. Yunus Zwai added that the opposing tribe has the support of outside forces.
“People from the Toubu tribe are being helped by foreign elements from Chad and Sudan. We have arrested several Chadian and Sudanese fighters,” Yunus Zwai, spokesman for Kufra local council, told AFP.
The clashes are undermining the NTC’s efforts to maintain the country’s unity after the removal of the regime of Colonel Gaddafi. In January, forces opposed to the NTC managed to retake the former Gaddafi stronghold of Bani Walid.
http://rt.com/news/libya-tribal-clashes-ntc-897/

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Re: Lībija (2011)

Nelasītas ziņa tas_pats_lv » 01 Mar 2012 15:28

Extraordinary threat? Obama prolongs Libyan sanctions
http://rt.com/news/obama-libya-sanctions-continue-139/
Gaddafi’s gone but the Libyan threat remains. That is what President Obama thinks anyway as he told congress the sanctions his administration slapped on Libya in 2011 will remain in place for another year.
­Obama informed US Congress via letter on Thursday that the continuing threat posed by family members of the slain Libyan leader Muammar Gaddafi constituted a lingering threat to US interests.
“The situation in Libya continues to pose an unusual and extraordinary threat to the national security and foreign policy of the United States,” he wrote.
“We are in the process of winding down the sanctions in response to the many positive developments in
Libya, including the fall of Gaddafi and his government,” Obama further stated.
But Obama remains adamant that remnants of Gaddafi’s family present a clear and present danger to the US.
“We need to protect against this threat and the diversion of assets or other abuse by certain members of Gaddafi’s family and other former regime officials.”
He then concluded that it is “necessary to continue the national emergency with respect to Libya.”
Obama first declared a national emergency over Libya at the outset of the bloody uprising last February in response to perceived threats by Gaddafi to US national security and foreign policy.
National emergency regulations grant the US president the power to impose sanctions on foreign countries.
In December the US and UN Security Council lifted most of the sanctions which had been imposed on Libya, a move which subsequently freed up $30 billion in frozen assets.
But since the US-NATO campaign ousted the former Libyan leader last October, the current threat to most Libyans has little connection to the remnants of the Gaddafi era.
Widespread reports of torture and other human rights abuses at the hands of both the new regime and various tribal militias have highlighted the anarchic nature of post-Gaddafi Libya.
And last Monday, local residents drove pro-government forces out of Bani Walid in response to regular abuses committed by former rebel fighters.
In light of the situation on the ground, it remains curious that President Obama would see elements of the former regime as posing the greatest security threat to US interests.
For the Libyan people, many of the forces currently unleashing chaos across the country are seemingly the very ones President Obama helped bring to power.

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Re: Lībija (2011)

Nelasītas ziņa tas_pats_lv » 08 Mar 2012 19:51

East Libyan leaders declare autonomy from Tripoli
REUTERS - Delegates announced plans for greater autonomy on Tuesday in the Libyan city of Benghazi, prompting an immediate warning from the central government of a foreign-inspired plot to break up the country.
About 3,000 delegates in the eastern city announced they were setting up a council to run Cyrenaica, the province which is home to Libya’s biggest oil fields, in defiance of the government in Tripoli.
The declaration tapped into longstanding unhappiness in the east of Libya at what it regards as neglect and marginalisation by the rulers in the capital, more than 1,000 km (620 miles) to the west.
It deepened the troubles of the National Transitional Council (NTC), the body internationally recognised as Libya’s leadership after last year’s rebellion ousted Muammar Gaddafi. The NTC is already struggling to assert its authority over militias and towns which pay little heed to Tripoli.
“I regret to say that these (foreign) countries have financed and supported this plot that has arisen in the east,” NTC chairman Mustafa Abdel Jalil told reporters.
“I call on my brothers, the Libyan people, to be aware and alert to the conspiracies that are being plotted against them and to be aware that some people are dragging the country back down into a deep pit.”
Moves towards greater autonomy for Cyrenaica—the birth-place of the anti-Gaddafi revolt—may worry international oil companies operating in Libya because it raises the prospect of them having to re-negotiate their contracts with a new entity.
A member of staff who answered the phone at Benghazi-based Arabian Gulf Oil Company (Agoco), Libya’s biggest state-owned oil firm, said the 3,000 employees had been deliberating about whether or not to back the autonomy declaration.
“Some people are in favour and some people are against but there is no official stance yet,” the Agoco employee said.
Several hundred people gathered in Benghazi on Tuesday night to protest against the push for autonomy. They carried placards saying: “No to federalism.”

Royal line
The congress in Benghazi named Ahmed al-Senussi, a relative of Libya’s former king and a political prisoner under Gaddafi, as leader of the self-declared Cyrenaica Transitional Council.
An eight-point declaration said the “Cyrenaica Provincial Council is hereby established ... to administer the affairs of the province and protect the rights of its people”.
It said, though, that it accepted the NTC as “the country’s symbol of unity and its legitimate representative in international arenas.”
The declaration in Benghazi does not carry legal force. It was not clear if the Cyrenaica council would operate within the framework of the NTC, or as a rival to it.
One analyst said the congress in Benghazi would change little on the ground.
“Today’s statement from Benghazi was more a declaration by a group in favour of a high degree of autonomy, rather than a declaration of that autonomy itself,” said Alex Warren, a director of Frontier, a Middle East and North Africa consultancy.
“In reality, Libya is now effectively composed of many de facto self-governing towns and cities, overseen by a weak central authority,” he said.
“The process of integrating these into a new political and economic structure will be volatile ... but I don’t necessarily see it as the spark for any major civil conflict.”

Sidelined
Cyrenaica stretches westwards from the Egyptian border to the Sirte, half-way along Libya’s Mediterranean coastline.
The province enjoyed prestige and power under King Idris, Libya’s post-independence ruler, because the royal family’s powerbase was in the east.
But when the king was toppled by Gaddafi in a military coup in 1969, eastern Libya was sidelined for the next four decades. Residents complain that they have been denied a fair share of the country’s oil wealth.
The rebellion last year which overthrew Gaddafi gave new impetus to calls for local self-determination in the east. These became even more vocal as frustration grew with the slow pace at which the new leadership in Tripoli was restoring order and public services after the revolt.
Some Libyans have dismissed the moves for autonomy in eastern Libya as a ploy by a coterie of wealthy families who had prospered under the old monarchy.
http://www.france24.com/en/20120306-lib ... federalism

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Re: Lībija (2011)

Nelasītas ziņa tas_pats_lv » 18 Mar 2012 17:36

Mar 18, 10:12 AM EDT
Clashes erupt in Libya's capital, 1 killed
By RAMI AL-SHAHEIBI
Associated Press

TRIPOLI, Libya (AP) -- A clash has erupted in Libya's capital, Tripoli, between a militia and residents, killing at least one person.
The fighting involves a powerful militia from Zintan in Libya's western mountains and armed residents of a Tripoli neighborhood once loyal to ousted dictator Moammar Gadhafi.
The well-equipped fighters from Zintan are one of many militias outside government control.
Zintan rebel commander Mohammed el-Rebay said one of his fighters was killed Sunday. He said the two sides are firing automatic rifles at each other.
The clashes are taking place in Tripoli's Abu Selim neighborhood, a pro-Gadhafi stronghold.
The opposition took control of the city in August and later captured and killed Gadhafi.
After Tripoli fell, the Zintan rebels took over a school in the district and converted it into a military base.

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Re: Lībija (2011)

Nelasītas ziņa tas_pats_lv » 26 Mar 2012 18:25


youtu.be/RRLyffW8faQ

Colonel Muammar Gaddafi was wanted dead so his secrets would die with him. So insists Mahmoud Jibril, the man who led the NTC uprising to overthrow Colonel Gaddafi's regime, in an exclusive interview with RT.

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Re: Lībija (2011)

Nelasītas ziņa tas_pats_lv » 30 Mar 2012 16:00

Militia clashes in southern Libya kill nearly 50
(Reuters) - Three days of clashes between rival militias in southern Libya spread to the centre of the country's fourth largest city Sabha on Tuesday despite the deployment of army troops trying to stop the violence which has so far killed nearly 50 people.
The clashes highlight the problems the government faces in imposing its authority following the overthrow of Muammar Gaddafi last year.
Fighting between gunmen from Sabha and those from the Tibu ethnic group had reached the centre of the city, said Ibrahim Misbah, a doctor at the main hospital.
An Interior Ministry official said the army had sent 300 soldiers stationed in southern Libya to help calm the situation on Monday. Another 300 soldiers left Tripoli on Tuesday to assist, he added.
Sabha fighter Oweidat al-Hifnawi said government forces had arrived in Sabha and were "in the middle of the clashes".
"We know that they are here to try to solve the problem and not fight," he said. "There are unconfirmed reports that they have retreated out of the city."
The ruling National Transitional Council (NTC) is struggling to assert its authority across Libya, where rival militias and tribal groups are jostling for power and resources after the revolution that ousted Gaddafi.
Hampered by a lack of a coherent national army, the NTC has struggled to persuade the many militias who fought Gaddafi to lay down their arms and join the armed forces and police.
Abdulmajid Saif al-Nasser, an NTC representative for Sabha, said he was resigning in protest because he said the Council was not doing enough to stop the violence.
"I have not seen any reaction from the Council to what is happening now in Sabha. The air force has not been sent out, there was only a plane from the health ministry carrying medicine," he told Libyan television. "The state is supposed to intervene in these cases ... but there is no state."

CLOSE TO 50 PEOPLE KILLED

Fourteen people were killed on Tuesday and 30 people wounded, Misbah said, giving numbers for the Sabha side. Around 20 people were killed in fighting by Monday, he said.
"The hospital crew has been working around the clock since Monday night and the injured keep coming in," he told Reuters.
Ali Galama, a Tibu representative on the NTC from Murzuq, south of Sabha, said 15 people were killed on the Tibu side and 18 were wounded. While he was speaking from Benghazi, he said he was in touch with Tibu in the area by telephone.
The fighting broke out on Sunday after a Sabha man was killed in a dispute over a car.
A fighter called Hifnawi said the clashes had moved from around the airport to the downtown area. "There are Tibu snipers all over the Sabha city centre and the number of the wounded keeps going up," Hifnawi said.
Mousa al-Koni, a Tibu representative on the NTC, said by phone from Tunis that the clashes had escalated after Tibu former fighters tried to steal a car from a member of the Sabha militia. He said a reconciliation committee was being formed to help stop the violence.
Last month, dozens of people were killed in clashes between tribes in the far southeastern province of Al Kufra. Armed forces eventually intervened to stop the fighting, in a rare example of the Tripoli government imposing its authority.
(Writing By Hadeel Al-Shalchi and Marie-Louise Gumuchian, editing by David Stamp)
http://www.reuters.com/article/2012/03/ ... 5K20120327

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Re: Lībija (2011)

Nelasītas ziņa tas_pats_lv » 02 Apr 2012 14:10

150 dead in Libyan tribal clashes reveal vacuum in authority
Published: 01 April, 2012, 00:13
Edited: 01 April, 2012, 17:22
Libya's interim government says a ceasefire has been reached in a six-day conflict between two tribes that has claimed some 150 lives in the southern city of Sabha. However, the violence exposes the government's tenuous grasp in the country.
Premier Minister Abdel Rahim al-Kib told reporters in the capital Tripoli that "calm now prevails in Sabha." Previous ceasefires had been announced throughout the week, but collapsed within hours each time, as deep-seated local tensions erupted into violence.
The conflict in Sabha is between the indigenous Arabic population and the Tubu, a tribe that stretches through Niger, Chad and Libya itself, though its members are regarded as outsiders by many in the city.
Residents of the oasis say that the rivalry burst into open conflict Monday after a Tubu shot a member of the Arab Abu Seif tribe. Further aggravating the conflict, a delegation of Tubu elders and armed men heading to reconciliation talks were ambushed. The violence escalated as more and more families were dragged into a deadly blood feud that killed almost 150 people. In addition to the dead, more than four hundred have been injured, overwhelming local hospitals.
Sabha residents say the two groups exchanged fire with automatic rifles, mortars, and rockets. Tubu tribal spokesman Mohammed Lino said some 70 Tubu homes were torched and 100 families were forced to flee the city during the past week of violence. Some families from Sabha said they fled the city by foot as bullets whizzed by, sometimes striking women and children.
Libya's Tubu have kinsmen living across the border in Chad, and the defense ministry said Saturday that it sent a number of militiamen and national army soldiers to the country's southern border in case other African tribes tried to join the fight. Other militiamen as well as tribal chiefs from around Libya were dispatched to Sabha over the past few days. On Thursday, a cease-fire was reportedly brokered that residents say has held in the city, though not outside.
­
Libya disintegrating

Although Libya’s National Transitional Council nominally controls all of the country, in practice it has struggled to integrate the disparate tribal militias who fought Gaddafi into a single national force. As a result, large parts of Libya have disintegrated into separate fiefdoms.
The clashes in the oasis region some 650 kilometers south of Tripoli show the fragile authority of the Libyan government, particularly in the isolated settlements that dot the southern desert. With only a nascent national army and police force, Libya's ruling National Transitional Council relies on militias comprised of former rebels to keep the peace. However, the country's vast distances make it difficult to deploy them to trouble spots.
The Council has already been accused of passivity, but no-one knows for sure if it actually has the manpower to resolve a conflict in a city that far away from the capital.
The Sabha conflict is not the first major outbreak of violence. Clashes in Al Kufra, also involving the Tubu, killed more than a hundred people last month.
http://rt.com/news/libya-sabha-tubu-tribal-944/

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Re: Lībija (2011)

Nelasītas ziņa tas_pats_lv » 04 Apr 2012 16:30

Renewed clashes between Libyan militias, 26 dead
Published: 04 April, 2012, 18:00
At least 26 people have been killed as violence flares up once again in the western Libyan town of Zwara.
­This comes after tensions sparked over the weekend between the Arab-majority town of Ragdalein and the Berber-dominated town of Zwara, about 110 kilometers west of the capital Tripoli.
The violence is fuelled by deep-rooted animosity between the neighbors, who took different sides in Libya's civil war that toppled Muammar Gaddafi last year.
The clashes had escalated by Tuesday, with militia groups opening tank and artillery fire on each other. At least 22 people died in the fighting.
The National Transitional Council (NTC), which took power after Gaddafi's capture and killing in October, has struggled to stamp its authority on the country and rein in the myriad armed groups that helped defeat the dictator's forces but have refused to disarm.
These local rivalries threaten to divide Libya along tribal and regional lines.
http://rt.com/news/libya-fighting-conflict-dead-243/

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Re: Lībija (2011)

Nelasītas ziņa tas_pats_lv » 12 Apr 2012 10:44

Libya: So it was all about oil after all!
http://rt.com/news/libya-all-about-oil-818/
Last year NATO countries bombed Libya, demanding “democracy” in the country. But now it’s clear it was all about oil and it’s not like the Americans and Brits are going to be democratic about it, and share those spoils equally with France and Italy.
So… oil giants Total from France and ENI from Italy are just going to have to wait in the sidelines while the hungry American and British big boys take their juicy oil slices first… ExxonMobil, Chevron, Texaco, BP, Shell…
It’s no surprise then to read in The Wall Street Journal that the US Securities & Exchange Commission (SEC), together with the puppet Libyan “authorities” are launching “investigations” into both companies’ “financial irregularities” in their shady dealings during the forty-two years of Gaddafi’s power. Now who would have imagined this! An Italian oil company involved in kick-backs? Corruption at the highest echelons of the French oil industry?!? Tsk, tsk!!! Unheard of…! The US and UK would never do something like that!! Just ask Enron, ask Halliburton, ask BP…
Clearly, major oil companies will now be judged on how close or how far they were from the Gaddafi’s, and on how much their respective countries contributed to last year’s war effort. Perhaps even on how much and how far and wide they shared their huge ill-obtained profits. It seems that scorecards must now be completed…
It’s worth remembering that at the height of the Libyan fighting last year, the “rebels” found the necessary time, between their “freedom fighting” shifts, to set up a new national oil company. As Bloomberg reported on 22nd March 2011, “The Transitional National Council released a statement announcing the decision made at a March 19 meeting to establish the “Libyan Oil Company as supervisory authority on oil production and policies in the country, based temporarily in Benghazi, and the appointment of an interim director general” of the company.”
And just as big oil and big finance always dance together, that report then went on to explain that “The Council also said it “designated the Central Bank of Benghazi as a monetary authority competent in monetary policies in Libya and the appointment of a governor to the Central Bank of Libya, with a temporary headquarters in Benghazi.”
Like Romeo and Juliet, Tristan and Isolde, or Abelard and Eloise, Oil and Money are probably the West’s most universal and paradigmatic duo. Their love affair has been going strong for many decades.
Oil is a mighty powerful global business. Oil companies can make or break governments and entire countries. Nationalizing a foreign oil company like Iran did in the early fifties can put the CIA and MI6 spy agencies into full-gear ousting democratically elected governments and replacing them with “more suitable leaders'.
Trading oil in any currency other than the US Dollar as Saddam Hussein dared to do in November 2002 can get you invaded just a few months later. Even weak Argentina’s finger-pointing at illegal British oil escapades in the Falkland Islands resulted in the Royal Navy dispatching super destroyers and nuclear subs to the region…
Libya is the world’s 9th largest oil producing country and holds Africa’s largest oil reserve. Gaddafi was planning to introduce a new currency for Libyan and regional oil: the Gold Dinar which, contrary to the US Dollar, would have had true intrinsic value. Gaddafi’s central bank, in turn, was fully independent of the global financial usury-based system presently in global free-fall. Gaddafi was using oil revenues for his own people and not for the US/UK/EU/Israeli war efforts in the Middle East and further afield.
So, when the Persian Gulf became the very, very hot spot it is today, the global oil cartel together with the mega-bankers who shuffle those trillions upon trillions of Petro-Dollars all over the world, had to make sure that their respective governments would put their military on red-alert, as the oil giants scrambled for new sources…
The focus is increasingly on oil fields lying in “kinder, gentler” parts of the world: the Falkland Islands, the Brazilian Coasts, and Libya that lies smack in the middle of that easy-to-attack “it’s our-bloody-Mediterranean-Sea” North African Coast.
Last year’s destruction of Libya was a reflection of just this type of complex behind-the-scenes engineering of all these key oil, financial, military, media and political players. It’s the kind of Real News that seldom if ever hits the headlines… just because it is the Real News!
During the better part of last year until the public execution of Muhamar Gaddafi by the Western Power’s proxies inside Libya – i.e., mercenaries, criminals, thugs and CIA/MI6/Mossad agents, aka “Freedom Fighters” – the Western media repeated time and again how very bad Gaddafi had suddenly become overnight; how the poor Libyans were clamouring for “democracy”; and how the heroic Libyan “freedom fighters” based, armed, trained and financed in Benghazi were battling to “liberate” Libya and impose Clintonite “democracy” and “human rights”. Actually these “freedom fighters” overshot their runway: now that Libya is finally “free”, they’re asking for the Eastern Cyrenaica region to secede from the rest of the country.
Was civil war part of the West’s plan for Libya? Last year, after securing full UN backing via Resolution No. 1973 allowing NATO air strikes to devastate the country and impose the most violent regime change seen in recent times, NATO-backed thugs have plunged the country into chaos.
As the “Libya Business News” publication mentions on Tuesday, “About 3,000 people gathered in Benghazi last month to announce that Barca (Cyrenaica) was an autonomous region within a federal state. Barca is at the centre of Libya’s oil industry, with two thirds of production and three quarters of reserves there.” It is one of the three historic regions into which the country is divided. And while Barca has the most oil, the other two is home to two thirds of the population. So the question now is how the rich revenues from rich oil reserves will be “democratically” distributed among the population.
Adrian Salbuchi for RT

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Re: Lībija (2011)

Nelasītas ziņa tas_pats_lv » 21 Mai 2012 01:34

Elections for a Public National Conference will be held in Libya on 19 June 2012.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Libyan_Pub ... tion,_2012
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elections_in_Libya

Libyan general election, 1965
Early general elections were held in Libya on 8 May 1965,[1] following the dissolution of parliament by King Idris after the 1964 elections.[2] As political parties were banned, all candidates ran as independents. Nevertheless, in order to ensure the victory of pro-government candidates, ballot boxes were tampered with by police.[2]

Libya under Gaddafi


National elections were indirect through a hierarchy of people's committees. The head of government was elected by the General People's Congress. The last such election was held in March 2010.
Libya's parliament consisted of a unicameral General People's Congress. Its members were elected indirectly through a hierarchy of people's committees.
Suffrage was 18 years of age; universal and technically compulsory.

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Re: Lībija (2011)

Nelasītas ziņa tas_pats_lv » 04 Jūn 2012 16:26

Tanks, militia encircle Tripoli airport
04 June, 2012, 17:25
http://www.rt.com/news/lybia-airport-tr ... litia-952/
A Libyan militia has encircled Tripoli’s international airport, forcing flights to be rerouted to a nearby military airport, a security official reports. Tanks have been deployed to the airport as the standoff remains tense.
­A Libyan security official says the militia men occupied the airport’s runway on Monday, storming it with heaving machine guns and armored vehicles.
Another official said the group, known as the al-Awfea Brigade, is demanding the release of an imprisoned leader whom they claim disappeared last night, Reuters reports.
"The situation in the airport is very tense and tanks are surrounding the buildings. No one is allowed into the building," the anonymous official told the agency.
Thus far all flights into the airport have been diverted to Mitiga Airport, which is located 8 km east of the Libyan capital. All outbound flights have been canceled.
A spokesman for the ruling National Transitional Council said the kidnapped Awfea leader, Col. Abu Oegeila al-Hebeishi, was taken by unknown rebels while en route to Tripoli.
He was reportedly traveling from al-Awfea Brigade base of Tarhouna, a medium sized town located 65 km. south of the capital.
Tarhouna’s dominate tribe, also known as the Tarhouna, were favored by toppled Libyan leader Muammar Gaddafi and held many posts in the country’s military under his rule. Tarhouna locals are viewed with suspicion by former rebels who fought to topple the Gaddafi regime.
Bloody tribal clashes in the southern city of Sabha left 150 dead this past March before authorities were able to negotiate a ceasefire. The previous month, violent clashes in the southeastern district of Al Kufra claimed more than 100 lives.
Libya’s National Transitional Council (NTC) has struggled in recent times to reign in disparate tribal forces which fought on both sides of the last year’s civil war.

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Re: Lībija (2011)

Nelasītas ziņa tas_pats_lv » 21 Jūn 2012 22:16

http://www.rt.com/news/libya-tribal-clashes-war-350/
Published: 21 June, 2012, 14:43
Edited: 21 June, 2012, 22:52
Clashes between warring factions are heating up in western Libya. Tribes that once supported the country’s uprising are battling each other and pro-Gaddafi rival tribes - all against the background of freebee arms.
Press secretary of the Libyan government Nasser al-Manaa reported that clashes between three tribes from Az Zintan, Mizda and Al-Shegaiga village resulted in at least 105 deaths and more than 500 wounded just last week. The conflict reportedly flared over a strip of land repossessed by one of the tribes.
Al-Manaa revealed that the violence was stopped only after a government military presence was established in the region.
The number of dead and injured in Libya is comparable to the body count in Syria and following UN rhetoric, the ongoing violence in Libya strikingly resembles a civil (tribal) war.
Tribalism is an age-old challenge for Libya, always threatening stability and security. Former leader Colonel Muammar Gaddafi had managed to curb many tribal conflicts throughout the 42 years of his rule, often by using force. When an armed tribal rebellion broke out in 2009, Gaddafi had to use Air Force to bring the rebels under control.
Supported from abroad, an uprising against Muammar Gaddafi started in February 2011. Severe fighting between rebels and Gaddafi supporters lasted till October 20, when Colonel Gaddafi was killed by a raging mob near the city of Sirte after rebels took control of the capital Tripoli.
With Gaddafi gone, the National Transitional Council that came to power is facing the same dangers as the previous regime. The NTC has to deal with restless tribes that use the unstable position of central government to seize the territories of weaker neighboring groups.
When the situation got tough, the Colonel distributed as many as one million Kalashnikov assault rifles among those who expressed at least minimum allegiance towards the regime. And that number is just a fraction of that stolen from devastated military arsenals later on.
Libya appears to be so flooded with arms right now that even the grandchildren of today’s fighters will have enough thirty-round banana clips to sort things out for years to come.

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Re: Lībija (2011)

Nelasītas ziņa tas_pats_lv » 02 Jūl 2012 18:47

Libyan tribal clashes: 47 dead in three days
http://www.rt.com/news/tribal-clashes-l ... three-135/
Tribal warfare continues for the fifth day straight in Libya, with 47 killed in the last three days alone and over 100 reportedly wounded. Ethnic strife in Libya has cost hundreds of lives since the fall of Muammar Gaddafi’s regime last October.
­The Toubou and Zawiya ethnic groups are locked in a bitter conflict to control smuggling in the Saharan oasis Kufra, a town with population of around 40,000 conveniently located in a triangle where the borders of Chad, Egypt and Sudan converge.
The fighting erupted on Wednesday. Both sides are using heavy weapons, including armored vehicles. The Toubou people claim that Zawia are shelling Toubou neighborhoods with mortars, forcing them to strike back. The Daraa Shield brigade of the Libyan army deployed in the area has not intervened in the conflict.
Wissam Ben Hamid, commander of the brigade, told AFP that "negotiations are now underway to calm tensions."
Women and children have found themselves in the crosshairs of the conflict, constituting over 50 per cent of the wounded.
The Saharan Toubou tribe and the Arab Zawiya tribe previously had a dust-up in February. Those clashes resulted in the deaths of over 100 people, with the violence only ceasing after the Libyan government dispatched troops to pacify the bellicose nomads. More than half of the population has been displaced according to the UN.
In April there were skirmishes between Toubou tribesmen and the Daraa Shield brigade.
The dark-skinned Toubou claim they faced discrimination during the Gaddafi era and that the new Libyan authorities continue a campaign of ethnic cleansing against the tribe.
Besides Libya, Toubou tribesmen also inhabit Chad, Niger and Sudan.
The tribal conflict is flaring up on the eve of the national assembly elections in Libya, which are to be held on July 7.
The tribal violence is the result of the absence of national unity in the country, London-based activist and journalist Sukant Chandan told RT.
“All those tensions all those divisions that the Gadaffi era had kind of united and kind of managed successfully have come out in the open and everyone is fighting everyone for the bit of the crumbs that NATO is throwing at them,” he explained.
Chandan also said that the demise of Gadaffi’s Libya had left the African continent defenseless against Western hegemony.

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Re: Lībija (2011)

Nelasītas ziņa tas_pats_lv » 06 Jūl 2012 14:58

Libya elections: Muslim Brotherhood set to lead government
Libya's top politicians have hatched a deal that would see the Muslim Brotherhood lead the government after the country's first free elections in almost five decades takes place on Saturday.

Jamie Dettmer in Tripoli
8:30PM BST 05 Jul 2012
While the elections for a 200-member National Congress is unlikely to grant a majority to any one faction, the Muslim Brotherhood and its Islamist allies are confident they can join their counterparts in Tunisia and Egypt at the helm of leadership.
Negotiations between the Muslim Brotherhood and a secular-based political movement led by former interim prime minister Mahmoud Jibril have focused on forming a post-election government as soon as the result is known.
An adviser to Mr Jibril said the former prime minister was likely to take the post of figurehead president with Mustafa Abu Shagour, currently interim deputy prime minister of the Muslim Brotherhood, taking the prime minister's slot as head of government.
The Muslim Brotherhood would dominate the ministries.
In the run-up to the elections, Libya's interim government has struggled to maintain law and order.
A threatened electoral boycott by federalists in Benghazi, the second city, has rattled Libya's rebels turned leaders. Leading figures fear that large numbers in the city that triggered the rebellion against Muammar Gaddafi may shun the polls, undermining the legitimacy of the election.
Recent attacks on foreign diplomats in Benghazi by Jihadists, a series of ugly micro-conflicts between militias in the Nafousa mountains leaving 105 dead and 300 wounded in the last fortnight and fierce clashes between Arabs, Tebu tribesmen and Tuaregs in the south have put the country on edge.
"We need to ensure stronger and more capable leadership soon after the elections," said a senior official in the Muslim Brotherhood's Justice and Construction Party. "That is what Libyans want – more security and stability and progress being made to improve their day-to-day lives. They don't want deadlock."
Any coalition government would grant a prominent place to the al-Watan party of Abdulhakim Belhaj, sources said. Mr Belhaj acknowledged that the talks were under way. He said: "I negotiate with anyone who cares about Libya and wants to unite it."
The presence of Mr Belhaj in a Libyan government would complicate relations between Tripoli and London.
Mr Belhaj, the former commandant of the now dissolved terrorist outfit, Libyan Islamic Fighting Group, which had ties with al-Qaeda before disavowing violence, is suing the British government for approving his 2004 rendition to Gaddafi's regime.
Libya is using a complicated electoral system designed to ensure that no party sweeps the board in the elections for the assembly, which will oversee the new government and draw up a constitution.
One hundred and twenty seats are reserved for individuals – 2,501 candidates are challenging for those – and 80 seats will be allotted according to party lists. There are 1,206 party candidates.
But Islamic parties are likely to predominate, experts believe.
"I'd be surprised if Islamists, from the Brotherhood and other parties, don't secure most of the seats and a great chunk of the vote," says Dartmouth University professor Dirk Vandewalle, who's been advising the UN mission here.
The outgoing National Transitional Council, which has ruled Libya since Gaddafi's fall, announced yesterday that Islamic Sharia law should be the "main" source of legislation and that this principle should not be subject to a referendum.
"The Libyan people are attached to Islam, as a religion and legislation ... As such the National Transitional Council recommends that the (next) congress make Sharia the main source of legislation," Saleh Daroub, NTC spokesman, said.
Some secular Libyans fear the Brotherhood rising influence, despite promises from the Justice and Construction Party that it won't seek to impose religious views through control of the bureaucracy.
"If the Brotherhood gets in we will see a repeat of what's happening in Tunisia with underhand pressure on women to cover up and raids on art galleries," warns Majid Wanis-Gaddafi, the son of Libya's last prime minister before Gaddafi seized power in 1968.
The main storage centre for election materials in the eastern Libyan town of Ajdabiya was set on fire late Thursday night. The ballot papers for the town were burnt. The election commission is trying to print replacements in time for the polls.
Hundreds of protesters stormed the election commission's office in Benghazi last Sunday, ransacking files and smashing computer equipment. If they had managed to destroy ballot papers or voter lists, they could have derailed the election.
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldne ... nment.html

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Re: Lībija (2011)

Nelasītas ziņa tas_pats_lv » 06 Jūl 2012 15:04

Oil terminals in east Libya 'forced to shut'
By Jay Deshmukh (AFP) – 13 hours ago
RAS LANUF, Libya — Armed federalists forced two oil terminals in east Libya to halt production, sources said, days ahead of the first elections since a popular uprising toppled the regime of Moamer Kadhafi.
"The harbour is closed... The pumping and loading of oil has been stopped... The group that came were federalists," said Tumi Shakari, a supervisor at a major oil terminal in the port town of Ras Lanuf.
The action follows threats from a pro-federalism movement to boycott and sabotage the July 7 poll, the first since last year's uprising.
"A group of 15 people came around 9:30 pm (1930 GMT) and in a very peaceful and amicable manner asked us to shut down operations," the supervisor added.
"This group has certain demands that they want to see fulfilled and they have asked us to stop our work for 48 hours," he continued, adding that workers had to decided to comply to avoid an escalation.
"We are waiting for orders from the National Oil Corporation," he said.
A witness said the armed men had arrived in national army vehicles.
One of the central demands of the federalist movement is an equal allocation of seats in the 200-member national assembly which will be elected on Saturday.
The interim authorities, on the basis of demographic considerations, gave 100 seats to the west, 60 to the east and 40 to the south.
Ibrahim al-Jadhran, a protest leader, said demonstrators had also shut the port of Al-Sidra, 35 kilometres (20 miles) west of Ras Lanuf, and were heading eastbound to the oil terminal of Brega.
Tareq al-Tahi, senior superintendent at Al-Sidra, confirmed that the terminal had been shut.
We have been forced to stop production," he told an AFP reporter on site.
"At 7:30 pm (1730 GMT) a group of people came to us in armoured vehicles loaded with anti-aircraft guns and asked us to stop producing oil and loading cargo," Tahi added.
"The situation is the same in Ras Lanuf, Brega, and Haruj (near Ras Lanuf)."
Production of several oil companies are routed from the port of Ras Lanuf, including Libya's AGOCO (55,000 bpd), German company Wintershall (70,000 bpd) and Al-Haruj (80,000 bpd), according to industry experts.
The oil terminal complex of Ras Lanuf lies 360 kilometres (225 miles) west of the eastern city of Benghazi, cradle of the revolt that ousted Kadhafi, who was captured and killed last October.
Libya's oil production is up to 1.55 million barrel per day, nearing pre-war levels, according to government officials.
A former rebel manning a checkpoint on the coastal highway said: "We closed the terminal because we want our demands to be fulfilled. This is an issue of seat allocations."
Earlier on Thursday, arsonists set fire to a depot holding electoral material in the eastern city of Ajdabiya, which lies between Benghazi and Brega on the Mediterranean.
And armed federalists backers on July 1 ransacked offices of the electoral commission in Benzghazi raising concerns that the vote could be disrupted by such groups.

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