Lībija (2011)

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Nelasītas ziņa tas_pats_lv » 12 Dec 2011 14:18

'Cleansed' Libyan town spills its terrible secrets
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-16051349
The 30,000 people living in a town in northern Libya have been driven out of their homes, in what appears to have been an act of revenge for their role in the three-month siege of the city of Misrata. So what really happened in the town of Tawergha, are the accusations of brutality against the town's residents fair and what does it say about hopes for national unity?

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Re: Lībija (2011)

Nelasītas ziņa tas_pats_lv » 11 Jan 2012 18:34

Gaddafi supporters 'try to blow up Tripoli power grid'
A Libyan militia chief said on Sunday his fighters had captured nine supporters of otherthrown leader Muammar Gaddafi who had been plotting to blow up Tripoli's power grid on New Year's Eve.

Abdullah Naker, the leader of Tripoli's Revolutionists Council.
4:38PM GMT 01 Jan 2012
"We captured explosives with them that they bought from the black market and now we're interrogating them," said Abdullah Naker, the commander of Tripoli's Revolutionist Council.
Militia groups who helped oust Gaddafi last year still hold considerable power in Libya, and have taken the law into their hands in several areas, setting up road blocks and arresting suspects despite the presence of an official police force.
Mr Naker said the nine Gaddafi supporters had been funded by a group of businessmen affiliated to the former leader, who was killed in October after militias overran his home town of Sirte.
Mr Naker also accused the nine and their supporters of trying to relaunch the former leader's official television station Al Jamahiriya.
The men had been planning to set off a number of explosions in the capital, state media reported, quoting a statement from Libya's electricity and renewable energy authority.
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldne ... -grid.html

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Nelasītas ziņa tas_pats_lv » 11 Jan 2012 18:36

Fierce clashes in Tripoli between two former Libyan rebel groups
Two former Libyan rebel factions clashed on Tuesday in hours of gun battles in central Tripoli that left five fighters dead, a Tripoli military council official said.
3:40PM GMT 03 Jan 2012
Former rebels of Tripoli and a separate group of fighters from the city of Misurata fought with machine guns, rocket-propelled grenades and anti-aircraft guns.
Col Walid Shouaib, a member of Tripoli Military Council, said the clashes were triggered by arrest of a Misurata fighter on New Year's Eve by Tripoli fighters. He was suspected of robbery and the Misurata fighters were trying to free him.
Disparate groups of former revolutionary fighters have clashed repeatedly since the end of the eight-month civil war that toppled Muammar Gaddafi's regime in October. Disbandment of these armed groups, which are divided by the regions where the operate, has posed a challenge to Libyan authorities.
While playing a vital role in overseeing security of key state institutions in the capital, the uncontrolled ownership of weapons and the absence of a central security administration has given the militias a free hand in ruling areas under their control.
According to Shouaib, the tensions between the two militias began on the night of the arrest when a group of Misurata fighters tried to free the detained man, but failed. Instead, they were arrested as well. A top Misurata commander managed to mediate the release of all the men except for the one arrested for robbery.
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldne ... roups.html

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Nelasītas ziņa tas_pats_lv » 11 Jan 2012 18:38

Former Gaddafi colonel becomes Libyan army's new chief of staff
A former colonel in Muammar Gaddafi's military has been appointed as the new chief of staff of the Libyan army, two members of the country's ruling National Transitional Council said.
8:36PM GMT 03 Jan 2012
A former colonel in Muammar Gaddafi's military has been appointed as the new chief of staff of the Libyan army, two members of the country's ruling National Transitional Council said.
Yussef al-Mangush, who took voluntary retirement from Gaddafi's military and even participated in the rebellion against the former leader, was promoted to the rank of general and appointed as chief of staff, said NTC member Abdelrazzak al-Aradi.
His appointment was confirmed by Fathi Baaja, another member of the NTC from the eastern city of Benghazi, the cradle of the uprising that toppled Gaddafi.
The post has been vacant since the murder in July of General Abdel Fatah Yunis, who commanded the former rebels in eastern Libya against Gaddafi's diehards.
Mangush is currently a deputy defence minister in the interim government of Prime Minister Abdel Rahim al-Kib.
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldne ... staff.html

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Nelasītas ziņa tas_pats_lv » 11 Jan 2012 18:43

ICC gives Libya two weeks to decide what to do with Saif Gaddafi
The International Criminal Court has given the new Libyan authorities two weeks to decide what to do with Saif al-Islam Gaddafi, the imprisoned son of the former leader. Gaddafi, who was captured on Nov 19, has been indicted by the International Criminal Court in The Hague for two counts of alleged crimes
By Richard Spencer, Middle East Correspondent
5:47PM GMT 10 Jan 2012

Saif al-Islam, once seen as a reformist possible successor to his father, faces indictments before the Hague-based ICC for complicity in crimes allegedly committed by his father in his attempts to put down the revolution against his rule last February.
The Libyan authorities say he should be tried in Libya itself, however, and have been holding him in a house in the town of Zintan, south-west of the capital Tripoli, since his capture in the Sahara at the end of November.
Under ICC rules, countries must say what they intend to do with captives wanted by the court. Libya had been given until Tuesday to give information of Saif al-Islam's conditions, access to legal advice, and whether and when they will hand him over.
As the deadline approached, the Libyan government formally requested an extension to the end of January, but the ICC said in a statement that a response after January 23 would cause an "undue delay in the proceedings".
Although Luis Moreno-Ocampo, the chief prosecutor, has accepted Libya's right to hold the trial, ICC judges can still rule they wish to hear the case themselves if they deem conditions there not suitable.
The Libyan authorities themselves have given no indication of how they would handle the formidable logistics of setting up a legal system that would satisfy the international community as well as allowing the trial to be witnessed by hundreds of international journalists.
They told a Human Rights Watch investigator who was taken to see their captive last month that he would be allowed to see a lawyer once a secure prison had been established for him in Tripoli.
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldne ... ddafi.html

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Nelasītas ziņa tas_pats_lv » 23 Jan 2012 16:45

Enemy at the gates? Libyans storm NTC headquarters
Published: 21 January, 2012, 22:20
Edited: 22 January, 2012, 22:51
http://rt.com/news/libya-storm-ntc-headquarters-375/
Some 200 Libyan protesters stormed the headquarters of the country’s transitional government on Saturday in a show of frustration with the slow pace of national reform. But will their calls for post-Gaddafi transparency fall on deaf ears?

­Two weeks of protests in the city of Benghazi – the heart of the uprising against Muammar Gaddafi last February – came to a head when protestors used grenades to blow the gates off the National Transitional Council (NTC) compound housing the interim government.

The protesters, who demand a meeting with the country’s interim leaders, shouted through the windows at NTC members who could be seen pacing inside of the building, the Associated Press reports.

The demonstrators had previously set up a small encampment outside the compound as they called for greater justice and transparency from Libya’s new leadership.

But tensions mounted when the NTC passed a series of laws determining how parliamentary elections would be conducted this June – making no mention of how seats in the new legislature would be divvied out between different cities and regions.

Seeing that the allocation of legislative seats will ultimately shape the distribution of the country’s vast oil wealth, many demonstrators contend the NTC is not seeking to fulfill the people’s long-standing democratic aspirations.

“The election laws have not been approved by thousands of Libyans, and do not honor those who died for our freedom,” said Tamer al-Jahani, a lawyer taking part in the protest. “We don’t want to replace one tyrant with another,” AP cites him as saying.

While some were centered on the future of the country’s political institutions, others were focused on the plight of those anti-Gaddafi forces injured during the war.

However, calls for greater freedoms belie the actual situation on the ground in post-Gaddafi Libya.

According to a November report by the UN Secretary General, at least 7,000 men, women and children were illegally detained by rebel militias in Libya. Many of them are being held in prisons outside of NTC control, and have been subjected to torture and other systematic forms of mistreatment.

Clashes between rival militia factions have also become an increasingly common sight in the streets of Tripoli.

Coupled with warnings from British officials last month that senior level al-Qaeda leaders have been making their way to Libya to capitalize on an ever-expanding security vacuum, the developments could signal a potentially explosive crisis brewing in the country.

­Radio host and author Stephen Lendman believes the crowds are unhappy with the new, Western-backed government.

“A couple of hundred former rebel fighters stormed the Parliament in Benghazi," he says. "They complain they are not given aid properly, they are not treated properly. The new election was drawn up, and the people were promised they would have a say, but the people have had no say whatsoever – everything has been secretive. And the NTC government – let’s face it – is the puppet of Western governments serving Western interests, having absolutely no interest in ordinary Libyans.”

­It's Iraq all over again, says international consultant Adrian Salbuchi, with the flag of democracy brought in to guard Western geopolitical interests and pump oil while the "invaded" nation’s needs are ignored.

The mission of the ruling National Transitional Council is not, Salbuchi says, "to improve life. Libya already had a high standard of living under Gaddafi. What Libya does have is ninth-largest global oil reserve, and the top oil reserve in Africa. And that is what the National Transitional Council is being supported for. They promote Western oil companies, Western financial interest in Libya,” he told RT.

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Re: Lībija (2011)

Nelasītas ziņa tas_pats_lv » 23 Jan 2012 16:47

NTC head may resign – if he makes it out alive
Published: 23 January, 2012, 07:14
http://rt.com/news/ntc-resign-libya-regime-411/
The deputy head of Libya’s National Transitional Council is resigning in light of continuing protests. Sukant Chandan, a spokesman for British Civilians for Peace in Libya, says the Council’s head may resign as well – if he doesn’t get killed first.

­“The Gaddafi regime could control all of Libya, could find peace amongst all the tribes. The new regime cannot even control something in one town or one area," Chandan told RT. "They’ve been selling their oil and natural resources and sovereignty to NATO. And now the thieves – that is, the rebels – are all falling out with each other, they can’t even be paid by their own masters." He continues, "they've performed regime change on behalf of the former colonialists of Libya.”

Chandan says those who wish not to believe what Gaddafi said of life in Libya after the fall of his regime should listen to Jalil, who he says “probably is about to resign – if he’s not assassinated, like NTC military head Abdel Fatah Yunis.”

The analyst says Jalil has warned that Libya is “in danger of descending into a bottomless pit.”

“So really, this is the achievement of ‘freedom and democracy’ by NATO,” Chandan concluded.

And Abdel Hafiz Ghoga, the NTC's deputy head, has been accused of opportunism after dropping his allegiance to Gaddafi as the uprising kicked off. On Saturday, crowds of protesters stormed the NTC headquarters in Benghazi, angered by how the council has been handling the country's assets. Demonstrators threw rocks and metal bars at the building, breaking windows and damaging Jalil's car.

Mass rallies have been raging for weeks in the city of Benghazi, which is considered the cradle of the revolution that toppled the Gaddafi regime.
+8 (8 votes)

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Re: Lībija (2011)

Nelasītas ziņa tas_pats_lv » 24 Jan 2012 15:50

http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2012/ja ... bani-walid
Gaddafi loyalists take back Bani Walid
Reports say at least four people killed in clashes between besieged NTC forces and well-organised pro-Gaddafi fighters

10.10am: Reports that Bani Walid has been taken by pro-Gaddafi fighters are not true, according to Aziz Daw, a British based dentist who comes from the town and is in regular contact with relatives there.
In phone interview, Aziz blamed the reports on propaganda from local National Transitional Council official Mohammed Bashir. He said fighting broke out between rival militias the 93 brigade and the May 28 brigade.
Aziz said there is frustration at the way the new authorities have run Bani Walid. The NTC is failing to reconcile differences in Libya, he added.

http://audioboo.fm/boos/636640-it-is-nt ... ent-claims

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Re: Lībija (2011)

Nelasītas ziņa tas_pats_lv » 26 Jan 2012 15:19

26 January 2012 Last updated at 11:22 GMT
Libyan militias are holding thousands of people in secret detention centres, while the interim government struggles to assert authority, the UN has heard.
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-africa-16735217
The Security Council was told recent violence in Tripoli, Bani Walid and Benghazi highlighted the problem.
More than 8,000 pro-Gaddafi supporters are being held by militia groups, amid reports of torture, UN officials said.
The charity Medecins Sans Frontieres says it has suspended some operations because its work was being "exploited".
The humanitarian medical organisation said it had stopped work in detention centres in the north-western city of Misrata because some patients were being brought in for care between interrogation sessions.
At least four people died in clashes in Bani Walid, a former Gaddafi stronghold, on Monday.

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Re: Lībija (2011)

Nelasītas ziņa tas_pats_lv » 26 Jan 2012 15:26

26 January 2012 Last updated at 12:32 GMT
Libyan detainees die after torture, says Amnesty International
Libya's former rebels gather at a checkpoint near a mosque, outside Bani Walid on January 2012 Rebels have reportedly been expelled from ex-Gaddafi stronghold Bani Walid
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-africa-16741937
Several people have died after being tortured by militias in Libyan detention centres, humanitarian group Amnesty International has said.
It claimed to have seen patients in Tripoli, Misrata and Gheryan with open wounds to their head, limbs and back.
Meanwhile, charity Medecins Sans Frontieres has suspended operations in Misrata after treating 115 patients with torture-related wounds.
The UN says it is concerned about the conditions in which patients are held.
"The torture is being carried out by officially recognised military and security entities as well as by a multitude of armed militias operating outside any legal framework," a spokesman for London-based Amnesty said.

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