Lībija (2011)

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Re: Lībija (2011)

Nelasītas ziņa tas_pats_lv » 03 Okt 2012 14:54

Reports that French agent killed Gaddafi ‘nonsense’

A French intelligence expert has poured cold water on allegations that a French agent killed Libyan leader Muammar Gaddafi after making a deal with Syria to save then-President Nicolas Sarkozy from embarrassing campaign-funding revelations.
http://www.france24.com/en/20121001-rep ... -el-obeidi
Reports that Libyan dictator Muammar Gaddafi was killed by a French operative after Syrian leader Bashar al-Assad sold vital intelligence to Paris are “patent nonsense”, according to a leading French intelligence expert.
Mahmoud Jibril, who led Libya’s first post-Gaddafi government in 2011, told Egyptian television channel Dream TV last week that “a foreign agent infiltrated the [rebel] Revolutionary Brigades in order to kill Gaddafi.”
Jibril now heads the National Forces Alliance, one of Libya’s largest political groups, as the country works to produce a constitution ahead of elections expected in 2013.
Following his interview, Italian daily Corriere della Sera quoted unnamed Western diplomats saying that if Gaddafi had been killed by a foreign agent, “he would almost certainly have been French.”
These diplomatic sources went on to explain that the then French President, Nicolas Sarkozy, wanted the Libyan strongman out of the way after he threatened to reveal large cash donations to Sarkozy’s 2007 presidential campaign.
Meanwhile on Sunday, the UK's Daily Telegraph quoted former Libyan rebel intelligence chief Rami el-Obeidi saying that the Syrian government had sold Gaddafi’s satellite telephone number to French intelligence services, allowing them to track Gaddafi’s every move.
El-Obeidi told the newspaper that Syrian leader Bashar al-Assad, himself battling a growing rebellion at home, had cooperated with Paris in exchange for an easing of pressure on his regime amid an increasingly brutal crackdown that was rapidly escalating into civil war.
“In exchange for this information, Assad obtained a promise of grace from the French and less political pressure on his regime,” said el-Obeidi, who was head of Libyan rebel intelligence until he fell from grace after the mysterious death of General Abdel Fattah Younes, the commander of rebel forces fighting the Gaddafi regime, in July 2011.

‘Exclusively French’ operation

According to NATO’s official version of events that led to Gaddafi’s killing, an RAF aircraft spotted a convoy leaving the dictator’s home town Sirte in October 2011.
Officially unaware who was travelling in that convoy, NATO planes bombed it anyway, and Gaddafi was found by rebel fighters hiding in a nearby drainpipe. He was killed, apparently by his captors, as he was being taken away.
According to el-Obeidi, the operation to target and kill him was “exclusively French” despite the presence of Turkish and British SAS special forces in the vicinity.
“French intelligence played a direct role in the death of Gaddafi, including his killing,” he said.
However, according to French defence analyst and former intelligence officer Eric Dénécé, none of these allegations – especially that Syria had given Paris Gaddafi’s satellite phone number in return for leniency - add up.
Pointing out that in November 2011 France’s stance towards Syria actually toughened, with Paris being the first country to recognise the rebel Syrian National Council, Dénécé told FRANCE 24 the allegations were “a hoax - patent nonsense.”
“France did not need Syria’s help to track Gaddafi and Assad would certainly not have sold his telephone number in such a way,” said the former intelligence officer who now heads the French Centre for Intelligence Research (CF2R).
Neither Mahmoud Jibril nor el-Obeidi was a credible spokesperson, he said, accusing both of trying to dominate the media spotlight as Libya’s new leadership and government takes shape.
“Frankly, it was never going to be allegations of campaign financing from Gaddafi that would bring Sarkozy down,” he added. “This would not be a strong enough motive to order his assassination.”
FRANCE 24 contacted the French defence ministry, which refused to make any comment on the reports
.

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Re: Lībija (2011)

Nelasītas ziņa tas_pats_lv » 04 Nov 2012 18:26

Clashes in Tripoli as militiamen torch security HQ

Fierce clashes erupted between rival government-sanctioned militia groups in Libya’s capital Tripoli on Sunday, injuring at least five people, as militiamen torched a security headquarters in the centre of the city, looting it and a number of shops.

Rival state-sanctioned Libyan militias fired guns and rocket-propelled grenades at each in the Libyan capital on Sunday, leaving the police powerless to protect locals.
At least five people were wounded and a stray bullet entered a hospital, causing panic and increasing concerns about Libya’s precarious security situation a year after the ouster of Muammar Gaddafi.

http://www.france24.com/en/20121104-lib ... ed-looting

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Re: Lībija (2011)

Nelasītas ziņa tas_pats_lv » 23 Apr 2013 10:50

23/04/2013
Car bomb attack on French embassy in Libya
France’s embassy in Libya was hit by a car bomb early on Tuesday morning, injuring two guards and causing serious damage to the building.
“The French authorities will do everything in their power to shed light on the circumstances surrounding this heinous attack,” French Foreign Minister Laurent Fabius said in a statement on Tuesday.
Two security officials speaking on condition of anonymity to AP said that the motive for the attack was not immediately clear.
Authorities in Tripoli called the blast a “terrorist act,” according to AFP.
The impact of the explosion severely damaged two villas and two cars parked near the building, while the windows of a shop 200 metres away were blown out.
http://www.france24.com/en/20130423-fre ... d-car-bomb

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Re: Lībija (2011)

Nelasītas ziņa tas_pats_lv » 25 Aug 2013 11:13

23/08/2013 / LIBYA
Ancient Libyan necropolis threatened by real estate speculators
Local residents recently destroyed part of the Cyrene necropolis, an ancient Greek city in north-eastern Libya, to make way for houses and shops. Our Observer, an archaeology professor, laments the authorities’ unwillingness to act to prevent the destruction of this invaluable archaeological heritage.
Cyrene dates back to about 700 B.C. and was the oldest and largest Greek colony in eastern Libya, a region now known as Cyrenaica. Of the city’s former glory remains an enormous necropolis — nearly 10 square kilometres in size — used between 600 and 400 B.C. The necropolis includes 1,200 burial vaults dug into the bedrock and thousands of individual sarcophagi that lie on the ground.
Even though the city is listed as a UNESCO World Heritage site, local farmers have laid claim to certain parts of the necropolis and recently destroyed a section with the help of excavators in order to make way for new houses.

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Re: Lībija (2011)

Nelasītas ziņa tas_pats_lv » 17 Sep 2013 21:50

Libya prepares for its trial of the decade
Government refused to hand Muammar Gaddafi's son and spymaster over to international criminal court for war crimes
http://www.theguardian.com/world/2013/s ... fi-senussi?
It is Libya's trial of the decade, the playboy scion and the sinister spymaster facing their accusers in a case that promises to lift the lid on both the horrors and the excesses of the former regime.
Saif al-Islam Gaddafi, son of former ruler Muammar Gaddafi, and Abdullah al-Senussi will go on trial on Thursday facing a litany of charges and possible death penalties if found guilty. But the case has also put the new, precarious Libya itself on trial as it defies the international criminal court, which has ordered that the pair be transferred to The Hague.
Officials are eager to reassure the world that Libya will be able to stage a fair trial and is justified in wanting to mete out justice to its own, rather than handing over the pair to face international justice. "We will not have Mickey Mouse trials under this government," the justice minister, Salah Marghani, told the Guardian. "We had Mickey Mouse trials in the past and we saw the results. We had trials in sports stadiums and town squares with terrible results."
Yet the authorities have been unable even to bring Gaddafi to Tripoli from western Libya, where rebels captured him in November 2011.
The government has failed to persuade the city of Zintan's powerful militia to hand Gaddafi over, and he will not appear alongside Senussi and 28 other former regime officials on Thursday.
For three decades Senussi was Muammar Gaddafi's chief enforcer, accused of oppression at home and terrorism abroad. Senussi, 63, shared the Bedouin and army background of his boss and was chief hatchet-man to one of the world's most brutal and idiosyncratic regimes. In official photographs of the flamboyant dictator, Senussi's heavy, dark face is a constant feature, characteristically standing off-camera, eyes scanning the crowd.
Married to Muammar Gaddafi's sister-in-law, Senussi oversaw an oppression that revelled in public displays of brutality. Sport stadiums were used to stage mass executions that were broadcast on live television.
The brutality was the signature of a regime that ruled by terror. One film, viewed by the Guardian, shows a political opponent being beaten to death in one of the ruler's compounds by a swarm of soldiers, each competing to land the most savage blows. The man is shown being dragged through the throng, one soldier pushing through the crowd, brandishing a knife for the camera, which he uses to hack at the victim.
Senussi is most reviled for one particular crime, the massacre of 1,200 political prisoners at Tripoli's Abu Salim prison in 1996, which witnesses say he personally supervised.
Azerdin Madani, jailed at Abu Salim in the 1980s for his part in a failed assassination attempt against Muammar Gaddafi, remembered Senussi patrolling the corridors: "He was responsible for all that happened there, all bad things. He was the worst. When he was walking outside [the cells], you would know, you would feel the shiver along your back."
Madani suffered torture and near-starvation at the hands of Senussi's jailers, but says: "I want to see him have a proper trial; he should have justice. I want him to see that this is the difference between his way and ours."
Abroad, Senussi is linked to a wave of killings, including the 1984 shooting of British PC Yvonne Fletcher and the Lockerbie bombing; France has already convicted him in absentia over the destruction of a French airliner over the Sahara in 1989.
The case against Gaddafi opens a very different box – that of the excesses and wild years of the former ruler's children. After Tony Blair ushered in the end of international sanctions on Libya by meeting his father in 2004, Gaddafi, 41, moved to a luxurious mansion in Hampstead, London, to enjoy the high life.
Slim and boisterous, he numbered Lord Mandelson, financier Nathaniel Rothschild and Prince Albert of Monaco among his friends. The royal family entertained him at Buckingham Palace and Windsor Castle. The London School of Economics awarded him a controversial doctorate after a charity foundation he controlled donated £1.5m to the university.
Gaddafi was also an intermediary in his father's foreign dealings, arranging with British authorities the return in 2008 of the convicted Lockerbie bomber Abdelbaset al-Megrahi and giving big oil concessions to BP shortly afterwards.
In the early days, Gaddafi portrayed himself as a reformer. That vanished with the coming of war, when he famously wagged his finger at rebels on state television. That finger is now missing; Gaddafi insists it was severed by a Nato bomb as he fled Tripoli at the end of the revolution.
Prosecutors say both men will face a four-page charge sheet featuring crimes from the time of the civil war and the dictatorship that preceded it.
But with the country fragmenting amid spiralling violence, many wonder whether Libya can hold an effective trial. Gaddafi's ICC-appointed lawyer, John Jones QC, called for this week's trial to be cancelled. He told the Guardian: "None of the prerequisites for a fair trial are in place."
Earlier this month, a unit of gendarmerie kidnapped Senussi's daughter, Anoud, from the custody of justice ministry police in Tripoli, underlining the government's inability to control its own security forces.
Human rights groups say the kidnapping puts a question mark over Libya's ability to hold a fair trial. "The abduction of Senussi's daughter sends a very chilly message on the threats to potential witnesses," said Richard Dicker, director of Human Rights Watch's international justice programme in New York. "The stakes for Libya are very high, in terms of projecting, in this trial, that the rule of law is being applied."
Libya's decision to go ahead with the trial may also see the patience of ICC judges snap.
Since Gaddafi and Senussi were captured, The Hague has repeatedly castigated the Libyan authorities for failing to hand over both men to face charges of war crimes and crimes against humanity. Last year ICC official Melinda Taylor was detained for several weeks by Zintan militia after trying to visit Gaddafi.
Holding a trial in defiance of ICC rulings may see the court complain to the UN security council, which ordered the Libya investigations two years ago.
Back then, Libya's rebels were desperate for international support for their uprising, requesting the UN to order the ICC into action. Now, a more confident government insists neither man will be sent to The Hague.
Marghani said he hoped the ICC would be patient with Libya, emphasising that all would depend on whether the world sees a fair trial. "It is very important for the Libyans now that all the conditions of a fair trial are met. It is how we will be judged by history," he said.

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Re: Lībija (2011)

Nelasītas ziņa tas_pats_lv » 28 Dec 2013 06:08

WASHINGTON (AP) — The State Department says the Libyan government is holding four U.S. military personnel.

State Department spokeswoman Jen Psaki says officials are trying to determine what occurred.
Psaki said Friday night that the United States is in touch with Libyan officials to ensure the Americans' release.
The U.S Embassy in Tripoli includes a security detail. The embassy's personnel are restricted in their movements in Libya.

WASHINGTON (AP) — Four U.S. military personnel investigating potential evacuation routes in Libya were taken into custody at a checkpoint and then detained briefly by the Libyan government before being released, a U.S. official said Friday night.
No one was injured. The military personnel were taken to the U.S. Embassy after their release, a Defense Department official said. The official was not authorized to discuss the incident by name and requested anonymity.
The four were supporting U.S. Marine security forces protecting the American Embassy, the official said. They were likely U.S. special operations forces, which have been deployed to Libya.
An altercation apparently took place at a checkpoint near the town of Sabratha, the official said. Reports of gunfire could not be confirmed.
After they were detained at the checkpoint, the Americans were transferred to the Ministry of the Interior and held for a few hours, the official said.
The U.S. Embassy in Tripoli includes a security detail. The embassy's personnel are restricted in their movements in Libya.

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Re: Lībija (2011)

Nelasītas ziņa tas_pats_lv » 05 Feb 2014 12:51

Libya destroys last of Gaddafi’s chemical weapons

Latest update : 2014-02-05
Libya has destroyed its last known large stockpile of chemical weapons from the era of slain leader Muammar Gaddafi, including bombs and artillery shells filled with mustard gas, officials said on Tuesday.
“Libya is totally empty of any presence of chemical weapons ... which could pose a threat to the safety of people, the environment, or neighbouring regions,” Foreign Minister Mohammed Abdelaziz said in remarks carried by Libya’s state news agency.
The eradication of the weapons marks an important development for Libya, as Syria struggles to destroy its own chemical weapons hoard amid a civil war.
Western countries had been concerned that the weapons might fall into the hands of Islamist militants and regional militias as the North African state grapples with widespread disorder more than two years after the uprising that ousted Gaddafi.
Militia groups and armed tribesmen control parts of the vast OPEC-member country awash with arms, where the Tripoli government of Prime Minister Ali Zeidan has struggled to enforce its authority beyond the capital, Tripoli.

Western help

Abdelaziz told reporters that Canadian, German and American experts had helped destroy the chemical weapons stockpile at a facility some 370 miles (600 kilometres) south of the capital.
“The destruction in the region of al-Rawagha was conducted with utmost precision,” he said.
Libyan officials at the news conference said there were no other known batches of chemical weapons left. Andrew Weber, the US assistant defence secretary for nuclear, chemical and biological defence programmes, said that among the Libyan chemical stocks destroyed were 507 shells filled with mustard gas.
Libya began dismantling its poison gas programme after signing the Chemical Weapons Convention in 2004 but the operation ground to a halt in 2011 when the NATO-backed uprising against Gaddafi broke out.
Gaddafi’s government originally declared 25 metric tonnes of bulk mustard agent and 1,400 metric tons of precursor chemicals used to make poison gas munitions. It also declared more than 3,500 unfilled aerial bombs designed for use with chemical warfare agents such as sulphur mustard, and three chemical weapons production facilities.
At the time, Gaddafi was trying to shed his image as an international outcast and restore relations with Western governments following the US-led invasion of Iraq in 2003, which was justified as a move to eliminate Saddam Hussein’s alleged weapons of mass destruction.

‘Major undertaking’

The director of the Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW), which assists countries in verifiably destroying their chemical weapons, said the task in Libya had been a “major undertaking”.
The work was done in “arduous, technically challenging circumstances,” OPCW Director-General Ahmet Uzumcu said in a statement, crediting cooperation between Libya and his own organisation, as well as help from Germany and the US.
Preparations will now be made to destroy Libya’s remaining precursor chemicals by the end of 2016.
Meanwhile in Syria, the disarmament operation agreed to in December by Damascus – under threat of Western military action – is running seriously behind schedule.
So far just two small shipments have left the Syrian port of Latakia, accounting for less than four percent of the country's declared arsenal of most dangerous chemicals and none of the precursors.
US Secretary of State John Kerry warned Syrian President Bashar al-Assad on Friday that his regime could face consequences for failing to live up to international agreements on removing chemical weapons.
(FRANCE 24 with REUTERS, AP, AFP)

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Re: Lībija (2011)

Nelasītas ziņa tas_pats_lv » 06 Mar 2014 17:25

Muammar Gaddafi's son Saadi extradited to Libya to stand trial
Former dictator's son arrives from Niger to face corruption charges as delegates meet in Rome to discuss Libya's future

Chris Stephen
theguardian.com, Thursday 6 March 2014 15.07 GMT

Saadi Gaddafi, one of Muammar Gaddafi's most flamboyant sons, has been extradited from Niger to stand trial in Libya in what will be seen as a major coup for Tripoli.
Photographs showing the 40-year-old in blue prison garb having his head shaved were posted on social media on Thursday morning hours after Tripoli confirmed his arrival.
His extradition came as delegates gathered in Rome for the biggest international conference on the future of Libya held in two years, called in response to growing violence and unrest in the oil-rich nation.
Libya promised Saadi, 40, a fair trial, which is expected to focus on corruption during the former dictatorship. "The suspect will receive fair and just treatment, which will reflect international standards," said a government statement released by the London embassy.
Another Gaddafi son, Saif al-Islam, is in militia custody in the mountain town of Zintan and the dictator's former intelligence chief Abdullah al-Senussi is in Tripoli after being extradited from Mauritania two years ago.
Leaked US diplomatic cables from 2009 portray Saadi as the black sheep of the Gaddafi clan – a man without political influence in the family hierarchy.
He is best known for ignominious efforts to become a professional footballer abroad. He was signed as a striker, in controversial circumstances, by the Italian Serie A clubs Perugia, Udinese and Sampdoria in quick succession, but managed just 26 minutes playing time, and no goals, in four seasons.
In Libya, paternal influence rather than ability ensured a more extensive career with leading Tripoli clubs. Football commentators were ordered to refer to him by name – an exception to the rule that other players were called only by their numbers.
"He tried hard but he couldn't play," one former Libyan international player said. "But he was Gaddafi's son. If he ran at you, you made sure not to tackle him."
Giving up on football, Saadi – who was married to a general's daughter – threw himself into hedonism. In 2010, a Rome court ordered him to pay a £330,000 unpaid hotel bill racked up partying on the Italian Riviera. In Tripoli he kept nine lions in a private enclosure at the city zoo, their cages laid out in front of a picnic table where he would entertain friends.
Black sheep or not, he jumped into the limelight in the 2011 revolution when Tripoli fell to rebel forces and he contacted foreign media outlets saying he had authority from his father to broker a truce. When that failed, he fled to Niger, where he had been under house arrest.
Saadi's extradition sharpens the focus on continued wrangling between Libya and the international criminal court on who will try Saif al-Islam and Senussi – both wanted by The Hague for war crimes.
Ben Emmerson QC, Senussi's ICC-appointed lawyer is appealing against a Hague ruling that Libya can hold such trials, arguing this is impossible in a country racked by militia violence and instability.

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